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trancedelicbluesman

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About trancedelicbluesman

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  1. Looking for snare drums

    I've only had my XW a little while but I can't seem to find any snare drums (or high hats for that matter) in any of the factory drum kits. Am I just missing them? What gives? I'm not averse to creating my own drum kits but I would have thought the factory kits would be more useful.
  2. Serendipitous Sequencer Synergy

    I thought you did a really good job with it. If the XW was a popular instrument like a Fender strat or a Korg Kronos there might even be a commercial market for your book.
  3. What software for music do you like

    Mixcraft has been on my radar for quite a while now. You certainly get a lot for your money.
  4. Serendipitous Sequencer Synergy

    I am still trying to wrap my head around all this. I can dig the step sequencer but I initially thought it had about half as many steps as I needed. But then I learned about the chain function, so I think I will probably find it pretty useful after all. But it seems to have a number of quirks. This is the first instrument I have ever owned that had an arpeggiator. I know step sequencers and arpeggiators have been in the electronic music toolbox a long time but this is really my first exposure to these things. Anyway, Allen, I appreciate the work you put in trying to communicate all this stuff. Maybe you will ultimately land a position as a native English speaker writing casio manuals. They could do worse. Still not sure where the phrase sequencer fits into things.
  5. The XW-P1 Companion, Volume 1 - Rev 4

    Impressive work! The XW can be hard to figure out; this will be very helpful.
  6. Some thoughts: 1. If you bought your xw used and it didn't come with the manual, you will need to download it (at the very least), and there is also a pcm wave list you can download. I was not able to figure out on my own how to switch between hex layers when programming a sound (turns out it's the part select buttons). 2. Envelope and filter options are quite limited. There are no filter envelopes and as far as I can tell there are no pitch envelopes either. There is a filter "cutoff" value for each element, and that's all you get. There are no amplitude envelopes per se, either; instead, each pcm wave seems to have a rudimentary amp envelope associated with it ("dyno EP" behaves differently than any saw or organ wave, for example, and a lot of the samples have attack transients baked into them), but you do get to enter some offset values in the amplitude envelope editing section, which I acknowledge is better than nothing. 8 3. There is a separate area for user sounds. Kudos to Casio for this excellent choice. You don't have to overwrite anything. 4. A few years back I owned a WK3200 and much of the pcm waveform ROM on the xw is the same. Dated, much? But it's mostly all decent and usable if not spellbindingly great. The exception is the Rhodes EP sound. On the WK, which used the Casio ZPI synth engine, high and low harmonics were looped seperately, I believe. The sound was much more 3 dimensional on the WK than on the xw (or the WK7xxx series for that matter). Just saying. The Rhodes was really good on the older instrument. 5. There are certainly a ton of pcm waves available but a lot of them sound awful similar. Is there really a lot of difference between "choirahhs" and "heavenB"? To name but one of many examples. Much has been made of all the new synth waves but really, isn't one sawtooth pretty much like another? Yeah they have moog saw and jupiter saw but they're all short samples and they don't sound much different from one another. 6. The physical build of the instrument is more than satisfactory. Keyboard feel is light synth action and I like it fine. I bought this to use as a controller but I am quite happy with it's sound producing features. Plastic, yeah, but sturdy plastic. I feel like I got a real good deal.
  7. Some thoughts: 1. If you bought your xw used and it didn't come with the manual, you will need to download it (at the very least), and there is also a pcm wave list you can download. I was not able to figure out on my own how to switch between hex layers when programming a sound (turns out it's the part select buttons). 2. Envelope and filter options are quite limited. There are no filter envelopes and as far as I can tell there are no pitch envelopes either. There is a filter "cutoff" value for each element, and that's all you get. There are no amplitude envelopes per se, either; instead, each pcm wave seems to have a rudimentary amp envelope associated with it ("dyno EP" behaves differently than any saw or organ wave, for example, and a lot of the samples have attack transients baked into them), but you do get to enter some offset values in the amplitude envelope editing section, which I acknowledge is better than nothing. 3. There is a separate area for user sounds. Kudos to Casio for this excellent choice. You don't have to overwrite anything. 4. A few years back I owned a WK3200 and much of the pcm waveform ROM on the xw is the same. Dated, much? But it's mostly all decent and usable if not spellbindingly great. The exception is the Rhodes EP sound. On the WK, which used the Casio ZPI synth engine, high and low harmonics were looped seperately, I believe. The sound was much more 3 dimensional on the WK than on the xw (or the WK7xxx series for that matter). Just saying. The Rhodes was really good on the older instrument. 5. There are certainly a ton of pcm waves available but a lot of them sound awful similar. Is there really a lot of difference between "choirahhs" and "heavenB"? To name but one of many examples. Much has been made of all the new synth waves but really, isn't one sawtooth pretty much like another? Yeah they have moog saw and jupiter saw but they're all short samples and they don't sound much different from one another. 6. The physical build of the instrument is more than satisfactory. Keyboard feel is light synth action and I like it fine. I bought this to use as a controller but I am quite happy with it's sound producing features. Plastic, yeah, but sturdy plastic. I feel like I got a real good deal.
  8. What software for music do you like

    I'm looking at Reason 10 and Komplete 11 and Steinberg Absolute 3. Opinions anyone?
  9. So what should I buy next?

    Interesting. Thank you. I'll check out those links. I do intend to get Reaper and I have no problem paying their very reasonable price. Other than that I will be proceeding slowly. Files... partions... folders... I have some stuff to learn. I must say, though, I am impressed by what I have seen of Komplete 11.
  10. So what should I buy next?

    What I have already bought: Nice little asus 2 in 1 laptop/tablet with touch screen, 16 gb, 512 gb ssd. Used xwp1 at my local (asheville) guitar center. Bought the computer to run software (says Captain Obvious) and the keyboard to input notes. So really what software should I buy? Also interested in the interesting stand alone capabilities of the xwp1. Some cool synth functions there, it appears.
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