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PX-5S: Features you're glad ARE included. Features you wish WERE included.


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#1 SonnyDaye

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 11:45 PM

Post what you like about the features included in the new PX-5S and what features you wish were included. Then Mike can take all this input and create the perfect PX-6S for next year. 😊
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#2 pjprevitejr

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 09:05 AM

Good Topic!

PROS:
(4) TOTALLY FLEXIBLE ZONES
THE PIANO'S GRAPHICS ARE A DARK COLOR ON A WHITE BACKGROUND (MUCH BETTER ON A DIMLY LIT STAGE
(2) PEDAL INPUTS THAT ARE PROGRAMMABLE
BATTERY BACKUP
24 LB WEIGHT
A.I.R. SOUND ENGINE SOUNDS GREAT IN THE VIDEO DEMOS
(To Be Continued At A Later Date....)

#3 SonnyDaye

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 10:06 AM

PROS:
Overlapping Zones.
Rotary knobs, and, especially, the 6 sliders.
Improved sounds.

WISH LIST:
76 key version, hopefully bringing weight down to 20 lbs. or less.
Rhythm Pattern section with variations etc.
Slightly lighter keybed action.
Larger screen display.


#4 BeowulfX

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 10:26 AM

As it is, the PX-5S is shaping up to be a good versatile 88-key stage piano contender...

Given its current features plus additional ones in the future, any chance the PX-5S and its future iterations will evolve to an 88-key stage piano-workstation?...

Features of the XW-G1 + XW-P1 + PX-5S + any future enhancements/features/functions + competitive pricing = dream flagship Casio Privia stage piano-workstation in 2014 or 2015... :)

I don't think there was any mention if the PX-5S has a 16-track sequencer feature though...

Sonar X3e Studio Dimension Pro 1.5 EWQL Symphonic Orchestra Pianoteq 5.11 Standard (w/ Bluethner) 
DAW PC (existing): AMD PhII x4 965BE 12GB DDR3 ASUS M5A97 HDDs 7200rpm: 500GB (OS) + 1TB (Apps) 256GB SSD (Samples drive) W7x64
Audio & MIDI interface: Scarlett 6i6 and Delta 1010LT, EMU XMidi 2x2
Keyboards/Controllers: Casio PX-5S Pro, Roland FA-06, Graphite 49, Casio PX-320

KS-40A, TS110A, KP-3, EV-5, KS-410B (Z-Stand w/ 2nd tier)

Contemplating on: Ableton Live, Session Horns Pro, Lounge Lizard EP4, Kurzweil Artis 7 (once available locally) or a mini-ITX Intel i7 build for live virtual instrument use

 


#5 stevecoscia

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 08:46 AM

Pros
It sounds good.
The assignable knobs, sliders, wheels and footswitches.
Cool design and lightweight.
Versatile sound set (piano, synth, EP, etc.)

Cons
Small display (this may offset with an IPAD application)

#6 kbeaumont

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 10:27 AM

Expression pedal
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#7 pjprevitejr

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 01:08 PM

ANOTHER PRO: A Brand new "Double Leslie" effect AND... programmable C1/C2/C3/V1/V2/V3 to use with the organ tones. Nioe!

#8 pjprevitejr

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:45 PM

The only CON, thus far, that I can think of: There isn't a provision for a CV pedal in either pedal input. You CAN adjust volume levels with either the wheels, control knobs or sliders but if you want to adjust the volume of the keyboard with your foot you still have to run the signal through an in-line pedal. Maybe this feature will be in the next generation (PX-7?) :-)

#9 Guest_Victor_*

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 05:01 PM

I want one !

When will they be available in the United Kingdom please ?

Pros:
256 note polyphony , sliders and dials, 88 note key bed

Cons:
Small screen
Non weighted keys?


I would like to see a larger display or at least an iPad app to take complete control.

I would like to have more sound banks to download.

Excellent videos on YouTube with Mike Martin.

Thanks



#10 Mike Martin

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 07:46 PM

Victor, the action is weighted! :-)
-Mike Martin
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#11 Guest_Longfellow_*

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 11:58 PM

An open letter to Casio, and Mike Martin.


At some point you should have already asked: "What directions would we like to see Casio take in Keyboards, Synths and Workstations, and therefore what would a flagship keyboard from Casio look like?"

Unfortunately I don't think Casio ever asks this question of itself, not just in keyboards, but also in watches and cameras and every other range they make and sell. As a result they are subject to extreme oscillations in popularity, as a brand, over time, because they don't ever clearly indicate where they're going and what they represent, but sometimes the others in their markets fail so badly they become a temporary default choice. See G-Shock watches for the best ever example of this Yo-Yo style swing in popularity.

What is the Chevy Corvette to the Chevy Malibu

What is the Lexus LFA to the rest of the Lexus and Toyota product range?


What is the Honda NSX to the Honda Civic?

What was the EX-F1 hinting at in the EX camera line of Casio? Is the PX-5S another EX-F1?

The brand of Casio is in a uniquely positive position. Other established keyboard, electronic and musical instrument brands and companies are, for the first time in a long while, completely unresponsive to the world situation. We're 4 years into a world wide recession that shows little or no signs of improvement occurring in the coming years. We really are in a new normal.

Casio comes from a position of innate trust with the audience of typical lower budget electronic consumers because they've rarely tried to be something they are not, and have often delivered surprisingly good products at surprising prices. But only the spec sheet and value conscious consumers have ever caught onto these items, and they've never created a more long term or higher perception of worth to the products of Casio or the brand as a whole. The Casio brand is like Toyota if Toyota had never gone beyond making the Hiace, Four Runner, Corolla, and Camry with the odd blip like the AE-86 hinting at a deeper potential of brand direction and values. Imagine a Toyota that had never made a Supra or Lexus. That's Casio.

The PX-5S is shaping up to be one of those moments like the AE-86 in early Toyota history, or the EX-F1 in Casio camera history. The last most noticeable of these moments in Casio's timeline was the EX-F1, a truly ground breaking camera that set the stage for many cameras to come, but then they never came and now we still think of Casio compact cameras as second tier, at best.

Sadly Casio never really followed through with the fuller potential promise of the EX-F1 to represent both aspects of the range of what their imagery capturing could be and what they were going to bring to their compacts of the future. Subsequently all their follow up cameras existed in a space where they were considered "gadgets" rather than the sons of a master class of top tier product technology trickling down over time, experience, research and passion. Casio looks completely soulless and directionless in the camera compact space.

Slow motion and high rate stills capture were the key points of difference in the EX-F1, but their were others, all of which could and should have been explored in ever increasingly "flagship", class leading, well priced, brand leading products that instil much more than confidence in the brand. To demonstrate the direction and the reasons for loyalty to the lineage of Casio gives buyers a reason to have faith in a brand for far longer than one generation of products, or one range of products. It's a benefit, very literally, across the brand.

However the EX-F1 was followed by a cut down version of itself, and then nothing.

This meant that all subsequent products in the EX range (all compacts, all "casual" style cameras) painted Casio as the makers of compact, non serious, insignificantly different nor superior cameras, and left all buyers of EX compacts to justify their purchases - leaving the established brands to remain considered the more prestigious compact camera makers because of their flagship product lineages.

This failure to extend and scale up the ideas and ideals of the EX-F1 to ever more prestigious, feature rich demonstrations of Casio's technical prowess and direction harmed the perception and sales of the lower tier products, their image and that of those that chose to buy them, creating a kind of reverse loyalty.

Nobody wants to need justify their choices all the time. The brand should do that for the consumer by clearly demonstrating its direction and qualities in a leading product that defines not only the brand, but the values and reasons for choosing any of their products. Casio fails to do this in every range it sells, constantly relegating it to lower tier after seemingly sometimes leading well into a range.

The EX-F1 didn't sell well, it came out at a rough time for the market, it was a bit of a shock t the market, its class leading features were yet to be understood for what they were and how they can be used to the advantage of the photographer and videographer. But none of that matters, because it should have been only the beginning of the lineage of F1 products in the range - the class leading demonstrations and test beds for the technology that will be passed down into the next generation of compacts, and the reason to trumpet ownership of a Casio compact.

Phantom cameras, and other high speed slow-motion cameras, have gone onto create the most distinctive footage we've seen in years since. No other camera manufacturer has gone onto making affordable high speed cameras. Casio could have and should have been THAT brand of compacts and ultra-zooms that the buyers thought of when they wanted to replicate the slow motion sports and wild life imagery they saw on their TV's.

Just about nobody knows that the Casio range of compacts all have slow motion, and Casio's done little to significantly improve its slow-mo performance since the EX-F1 because they don't perceive it to have value to the sales process. Ironically this is almost entirely because nobody knows what's special about the Casio range of cameras, or Casio itself and this is because there's not a class leading flagship to "tell and sell" Casio, their features, functionality and directions.

The EX-F1 should have been the beginning of Casio taking a new direction in mid to higher priced consumer cameras - that of stills/video/slowmotion hybrids able to literally "do it all" in a way that the other manufacturers still haven't come close to the potential direction the EX-F1 seem to be indicating. This, in turn, should have been trickling down to the compacts, both in terms of reputation and features and functionality.

Casio now sits in a similar position with musical instruments. the PX-5S is heading into a similar vein of offering great features at a great price, with some genuinely class leading stuff in there. 256 note polyphony being one, the 4 splits and USB out split as well, the Hex layering, the "Synth" in a controller piano action keyboard, the phrase recorder, the editable arpeggio's etc.. All great stuff. Not quite the EX-F1 level of revolution, but definitely indicative of the potential of Casio to offer more for less.

However in order for the PX-5S to really sell well, and in turn for the PX-150 and 350, 850 etc to continue to sell well, Casio needs to start becoming a brand we, the customers, can confidently get behind, by way of a class leading product that's a clear flagship and indicator of the direction and capability of Casio. Casio needs an NSX Keyboard.

Casio DOES NOT need more faux celebrities and other "notables" to be trumpeting their brand and products. That's just a crass, short term, dodgy way to get a bit of attention that causes most people to simply cringe. Mike Martin and similarly eloquent and straight forward demonstrators with a true relationship with the brand and the company are all that's required to market the products, particularly if you make great products. In this way Mike Martin and the products become celebrities. Saving massive amounts of pointless money on "celebs" that can be spent on ever better products.

The Casio brand must instil confidence and assuredness in the greater public perception by creating a flagship product that demonstrates the values of the brand and its line and future lineage in such a manner that buyers of the lesser products can feel proud of their attachment to the brand, rather than feeling they must constantly justify their choice. Justifying a choice gets tiring. The next time they'll buy something they don't need to justify, even if it costs more and does less. (for any of you wondering how the competitors continue to make money, this might have answered some of that question for you)

The answer to the question of this topic, "Features you wish WERE included." is, in its extreme form, the description of this flagship product and the key indicator of technologies that will drop down into the next generation of each of the lower range products.

Some of the things I'd like to see Casio try in the next update to this (already too) long letter.

#12 BeowulfX

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 02:14 AM

I understand the analogy made by Guest_Longfellow above between the EX-F1 and the PX-5S although the discussion part was overemphasized by seven (7) paragraphs ;)

After the XW-P1 and XW-G1 synths in 2012, I think the PX-5S is a great follow-up to Casio's return to the more serious line-up of electronic music instruments (as opposed to their years of being known as a manufacturer of kids' learning keyboards...among others things/gadgets they make of course).

Having some celebs over the booth to try out and play/demo the new PX-5S is, in the meantime that Casio is slowly gaining momentum, a wise move that may go a long way -- if only to try to remove the stigma of being identified with "toy keyboards" and create a new image of being a legitimate pro keyboard manufacturer that pro players are actually willing to use/play. Even piano software samples manufacturer like Ivory Synthogy had Dream Theater's Jordan Rudess as endorser of their new product American Concert D even if their company is already considered one of the best piano sample makers out there today.

I think the XW-P1 and G1 made some noise in the pro keyboard/synth scene, and the PX-5S is shaping out to be another good product to make some more noise for Casio -- until eventually people will start to recognize casio's synth/digital pianos and pro keyboards as legitimate contenders and good if not better alternatives to the usual suspects (i.e. Roland, Yamaha, Korg, Kurzweil).

Casio EMI had raised the bar at least within their company ever since they started out with the Privia line of digital pianos and the products that follow in the future, whether DPs, pro synths, workstations or hybrids like the PX-5S (hybrid of DP+ synth + midi controller) should always be better if their vision is to solidify their label as a manufacturer of serious pro keyboards until the Casio brand becomes acceptable among pro musicians/keyboardists as a music hardware they won't be embarassed to carry or use in gigs/live performances. "Strike while the iron is hot" rings true and while every musician open-minded enough to listen to the good "noise" that Casio EMI is making these days (thanks to products like the XW-P1/G1, Privia line of DPs and now the PX-5S), they should keep them hooked long enough to scratch that "keyboard itch" with subsequent innovative iterations of their synths, DPs, hybrid DPs if they are to keep them from wandering away only to lose whatever progress they have been making.

I don't think Casio should remove their name in the back-end of their PX-5S especially after XW-P1 and G1 had shown their capabilities and the possibilities of being better in their future iterations plus how seemingly good the PX-5s is turning out to be. In fact, these are the products that Casio EMI should use to identify their brand with to begin changing the notion that "Casio" keyboards are for kids or should be left home etc.In relation to this I agree with what Guest_Longfellow mentioned when he stated:

"The Casio brand must instil confidence and assuredness in the greater public perception by creating a flagship product that demonstrates the values of the brand and its line and future lineage in such a manner that buyers of the lesser products can feel proud of their attachment to the brand, rather than feeling they must constantly justify their choice..."

I'm still using a Privia PX-320 I bought sometime back in early 2008 and I've let the PX-330, PX-350 and PX-3 pass by given that the my 320 is still alive (after enduring a daily barrage of Hanon) and now connect it to PC via MIDI to enjoy the wonders of sampled piano. But I believe the 5 years that passed is long enough and I can't wait to try out the PX-5S once it becomes available here in Asia.

If the PX-5S sounds the way we've been hearing it played/demo'ed in You Tube recently by Mike Martin or their guest celebs or as promised, I may just give in and scratch that "keyboard itch" again instead of splurging for a Roland RD (5 years is a long time to save money for that keyboard itch ^_^ ).

Sonar X3e Studio Dimension Pro 1.5 EWQL Symphonic Orchestra Pianoteq 5.11 Standard (w/ Bluethner) 
DAW PC (existing): AMD PhII x4 965BE 12GB DDR3 ASUS M5A97 HDDs 7200rpm: 500GB (OS) + 1TB (Apps) 256GB SSD (Samples drive) W7x64
Audio & MIDI interface: Scarlett 6i6 and Delta 1010LT, EMU XMidi 2x2
Keyboards/Controllers: Casio PX-5S Pro, Roland FA-06, Graphite 49, Casio PX-320

KS-40A, TS110A, KP-3, EV-5, KS-410B (Z-Stand w/ 2nd tier)

Contemplating on: Ableton Live, Session Horns Pro, Lounge Lizard EP4, Kurzweil Artis 7 (once available locally) or a mini-ITX Intel i7 build for live virtual instrument use

 


#13 Guest_Longfellow_*

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 03:11 AM

The PX-5S is only part way there. And not a big way.

The first big step would be After Touch in a hammer action. Korg can do it with the RH3, so it can be done. Make a special edition, PX-5S-AT and throw on whatever the after touch modification costs. This might sell better than you first think.

As it stands, the PX-5S is a reasonable MIDI controller with a moderate synth engine and some minor league performance features - the arps and phrase sequencer come to mind.

The phrase sequencer is near completely misunderstood and absolutely poorly explained in terms of its intended purpose and functionality. Any money pissed away on "celebs" might better be spent explaining how this thing actually works, and where it's beneficial and what it can be used for, via both demonstration and instruction. Right now it's a black box, to most, and it seems nobody is willing to upload videos of themselves showing others the fuller capacities of this thing. This is as true of the XW's as it is of this, but it shouldn't be so.

Is there anyone that doesn't own an XW-P1 that can explain the Hex Layerings? I've watched all the videos and am still not exactly sure how it breaks down, or what it's 14 layers and not 12 or 18 that are available on the full keyboard of the approaching PX-5S.

The four programmable arpeggiators are much the same. Surely moderately powerful, but nobody knows how or in what way. This is as true of the XW's as it is of this, but it shouldn't be so. We know it's there, a bullet point on the promo sheets, but what does that actually mean "4 programmable arps"? How many notes in an Arp, what range, how many of them can the PX-5S run on one key press? How are the synced, how can they be played "unsynced" how can they be modified on the fly? Can their output be recorded as MIDI either on the device or out to a DAW? In what ways can this be coordinated with phrase sequencing for more complex pattern play?

Yes, Mike, I've seen your videos on youtube that touch on the surface of the XW's step sequencer, phrase sequencer and arpeggiators.
Here's one of them, but, as it rightly states, this is a QUICK tutorial. Why isn't there more:
// On another note, there's unanswered questions below this video from some time ago - WHY are they not answered? This is the CASIO youtube account, there's really no excuse for this kind of monologue type communication in this day and age.

In German we get a guy doing a "workshop" that's 4 minutes long. I've never been to a workshop that was less than 4 hours long: youtube.com/watch?v=IIM4Ua_9GU8

This is not to say that these things can't be basically understood in 4 minutes, they can. Just like the layers in Photoshop can be grokked in 4 minutes. However the greater power of these things, and their applicability to the Hex layers, the arps and other coordination they can have with the other features of these keyboards, means that fuller explanations of integrating them into creativity on these keyboards should be done - both the for users and as marketing. It's vastly better marketing than using "celebs" in this manner: youtube.com/watch?v=X6ZMdLJBJXk

In support of my argument that celebs are pointless for such products, the explanatory videos from Mike Martin (with near ZERO production quality) have as many views as the "celeb" videos. Yet which do you think have much more influence over both existing and potential purchasers?

Why not put some of that celeb budget into giving Mike both time and a film crew to make really good instructional videos? It's clearly a more productive use of time and money, for both marketing and consumer satisfaction.

Celebrity endorsements instantly become a ridiculous race to the top - of nothing. They don't explain anything. Watch any Jordan Rudess 30 minute demo of a Korg Kronos to see a guy say nothing for a very long time. You can't find a celeb that appeals to everyone, and there's no musician that does either. The best way is someone exactly like Mike Martin simply going through and explaining how to use everything, to the fullest possible advantage of the feature in isolation, in combination with every other feature of the product and then in conjunction with outbound and inbound connectivity as provided by the product. THAT IS ALL YOU NEED. And it's much fuller than simply skimming over things.


But that's all they do, these current videos, they only tickle the surface. Photoshop admittedly sells vastly more copies than these synths do, but it's priced about the same, whilst of similarly all round complexity and functionality. Why not think like software packages and actually really, truly delve into explaining the benefits of something? It's not like the other manufacturers are doing it. So you'll get a "point of difference" out of it, at the very least.

And this guy: youtube.com/watch?v=BVr9HgEURb8 He's good as well, but let him go into much more than superficial introductions. It doesn't cost anything to stream a video a 100,000 times, or a million. It's free. The only cost is making the videos, and that's MUCH cheaper than any single celebrity endorsement.

And these brilliant guys already work for you!


Pay them extra, give them the crews and time they want to work with, and let them present the gear as they know it to be, from the inside out. Far more beneficial to everyone than any faux celebrity being paid to say "uhmmm... yeah, Casio... Good! ... where's my donut?"

#14 happyrat1

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 05:56 AM

Well said Longfellow...

We've all been saying all along that Casio should release a proper book or a proper tutorial DVD as a companion to the XW series.

After all, all the power in the world won't help anyone if nobody can figure out exactly how to use it all.

And the existing manuals are little more than a collection of tables and self referencing button presses lacking any and all explanation of how and when they are meant to be used.

Gary

If it ain't fun it ain't music...

Listen to my tunes @ https://soundcloud.com/happyrat1

Keep on banging those keyboards :D


#15 Mike Martin

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:11 AM

Is there anyone that doesn't own an XW-P1 that can explain the Hex Layerings? I've watched all the videos and am still not exactly sure how it breaks down, or what it's 14 layers and not 12 or 18 that are available on the full keyboard of the approaching PX-5S.


Most keyboards have a relatively simple voice architecture, which allows them a up to a couple layers in a single patch or tone. A Hex Layer is a single tone that is made up of six sample components. (This is similar to Kurzweil's architecture although they allow up to 32 layers) These can be mapped to certain keys or velocity switched. In the case of the PX-5S each layer has independent filters, pitch envelopes and effects mixes...many things that could not be done on the XW-series.

In addition the PX-5S can run multiple HexLayer patches at once. The XW-series was limited to one, the PX-5S can do two at once and with 256 notes of polyphony available that allows you to get some GIGANTIC layered sounds or move expressive mapped or velocity switched sounds.
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#16 Mike Martin

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:55 AM

The four programmable arpeggiators are much the same. Surely moderately powerful, but nobody knows how or in what way. This is as true of the XW's as it is of this, but it shouldn't be so. We know it's there, a bullet point on the promo sheets, but what does that actually mean "4 programmable arps"? How many notes in an Arp, what range, how many of them can the PX-5S run on one key press? How are the synced, how can they be played "unsynced" how can they be modified on the fly? Can their output be recorded as MIDI either on the device or out to a DAW? In what ways can this be coordinated with phrase sequencing for more complex pattern play?


The PX-5S was just announced about two weeks ago and won't be in stores for about 2 months. We will continue to provide as much information as possible on these instruments by the time they ship. What you may not realize is how much the product has changed just in a couple weeks since NAMM based on feedback we received at NAMM. The software is wrapping up this month and then we'll begin updating the specs and features on the website.

Here is the rundown on the arpeggiators:
  • 16 Steps per Arp.
  • All 4 of them can run using four different zones on one key press.
  • They are sync'd to tempo, either internal or external. Each can have a seperate note value (8th note, 16th...etc)
  • Arpeggiator patterns on the PX-5S can have controller information with or instead of notes. So you can create patterns of filter or panning movements.
  • Their output (as it is on the XW) can be sent via MIDI to control external devices
  • I'll check to see if the their output can be captured by the PX-5S phrase sequencer....but I don't believe this is possible.
  • Each of the four Zones on the PX-5S can either trigger an Arpeggiator or a Phrase. So Zone 1 can have a phrase such as a bass line while Zone 2 is running an arpeggiated guitar part.

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#17 Mike Martin

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 09:03 AM

As for the rest of the comments - I simply don't have the time to respond to all of the point. However we are listening and we appreciate the feedback.

I'd respond in more detail but that would prevent me from:
  • Creating more tutorials
  • Creating more XW patches
  • Updating web content
  • Finishing PX-5S factory patches
  • Training our reps and dealers
  • Responding to YouTube comments
Seriously though, we're working very, very hard. I completely get that there are concepts in the the XWs and the PX-5S that have never been in other products. When you do something that is new and unique it requires an explanation. We're working hard on that. The Phrase Sequencer video as an example, I showed several applications. Can I show them all? Never There are thousands of possible applications. The ideas with videos like that are to show you the basics and hopefully inspire you to come up with your own, then share them here of the forum for the other users. Thats why this forum was created. :)

I appreciate your patience.
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#18 mysticfire

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 03:45 AM

Electric guitar sounds, large front panel and a dedicated software like the PX-410R model.



#19 Mike Martin

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:48 AM

We definitely have electric guitar sounds covered in the PX-5S.
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#20 BKT

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:29 PM

I watched Mike's demo's at NAMM and am really intrigued with this keyboard. I'm a converted guitar and bass player so for me it's all about simplicity. Features such as ARPs and sequencing is why I switched to NORD from Roland gear. It's simple, light, durable and well appointed. I've been seeking an 88 Key board mostly for home use but after seeing the PX-5S, I'm kinda thinking that I'd use this on live gigs more than I think. So what would people like me (a growing target audience by the way) who like to play keys but don't need or want all the bells and whistles?
  • Great presets with usable sounds. Not stuff that are too esoteric. I liked how the patches you wrote (overnight as I recall) for NAMM had piano, pads, strings, effects all at your fingertips. I love the idea that a 'patch' is really 6 patches that all exist at the same time and that when I want more, I add more from what is already there. Organizing them into groups - pianos, EP's, strings, etc..into folders would be very cool.
  • Maybe you do this already but 'sharable patches' that you can download from a cloud based site.
  • A good CASE that FITS and PROTECTS. Other Hard and Padded alternatives out there are too large for Casio's it seems. So the very benefit of having a 'small, narrow' keyboard is mitigated by this huge case. Your cover seems lackluster. Honestly, I'm surprised that more companies don't make ones to fit yours specifically based on how many keyboards you guys sell. I mean don't you guys have the leading market share in the space.
  • I saw how you used Set List with the iPad for sounds...that was cool. But being able to operate and edit from the iPad would be even cooler.
  • Real world examples of how patches are used in a gig situation. Again, not something that will never happen but how people really use it.
  • Easy demos of how to do keyboard splits and programming.
  • Best ways to tweak the best tweakable stuff. You did this at the show.
I'm ordering mine as soon as someone has it for pre-order. You said STREET would be $1,000, right?

Thanks, Mike for all your help. My first time at a Casio Forum and you guys do a great job.
  • Welshkeys57 likes this




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