ESSOJ

XW-P1 sequencer

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I'm new to this site, I've read it's contents and it seems very helpful to understand some of the xw-p1's secrets, I've got mine September of last year, but right after that I got a Korg Kross  and a krome and got hooked into those and neglected the xw-p1, but since last week I turned it on and I've been playing it and I realized that it is a very good synth, I've read the manual and so far I got a lot of it figured, till I got to the sequencer, the manual is not very specific about track recording, my question is, does the xw-p1 support  long multi track recording or just the short space of time that the phrase sequencer gives you? Any help will be very appreciated and thanks in advance 

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1 : On the XW patterns can be created for one Step Sequence.

2 : Sequentially you can chain sequence patterns using "CHAIN" and which step sequence in that chain.

3 : The Phrase Sequencer limit is the amount of note memory and there quiet enough of it. 

 

  

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As XW has described, the "chain" function will give you the ability to quickly put the shorter sequencer sections together in one continuous arrangement. The XW-P1 does not have a "linear" sequencer as in a typical software or keyboard multi-track sequencer-the WK series does. Check out the XW-P1 "faq" for details about how to use the sequencer for creating longer more "linear" sounding musical arrangements.

 

Although you are limited to 16 steps, by using the sequencer editor and mixer you can change note durations in a limited way-but will still end up with 16 steps max for each part. Using the pattern buttons with the sequencer can give you alot more "mileage" as each pattern can be programmed quite differently-then by switching these patterns around manually or connecting them with the chain function makes it easier to create something similar to what a linear sequencer would do-a different approach/more fragmented way of thinking-similar to a looping 'tracker" method of composition.

 

Check my recent post about "chaining" functions. One obvious (or not) part of chaining has been left out of the manual-and it is the most important part-using the "step" buttons to build your chain. and always remember (as Mike Martin stressed from day 1)-to hit the ":write" button or your work will disappear when you turn off the XW or swirch to a different sequence before saving your edits.

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