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deliusfan@outlook.com

some overly loud notes; repair estimate?

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I have just come into possession of a PX130 that my business partner has finally upgraded after a good 4 years of me banging on it in lessons. I have two or three (one pretty regularly, the others intermittently) that are registered too fast an attack and are screamingly loud. There are some Casio repair shops in my area; has anyone had this issue addressed and repaired, and if so, what is a ballpark figure (per note, or per service, whatever) I could expect to shell out? Considering I now have this keyboard for free, as long as the repair isn't too expensive, it will be worth it.

 

Thanks,

Michael

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There's probably dirt under the key contacts. Some people have used compressed air to fix this, others have disassembled the keyboards themselves and cleaned under the rubber things. There are other posts around the forums with info if you want to try this yourself. Other models have the same fix.

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I don't think dirt can cause it (these contact pads are well protected from dust - see my photos in the post). I successfully fixed the same issue on my Casio PX-135 by replacing bottom (double-padded) contact strips for the defective keys. See the detailed description here:

 

 

It is for PX-135, but PX-130 should be very similar.

 

The cost to replace all seven 12-key stripes is 2$ x 7 + 13$ shipping to Canada = 27$. It wasn't in stock, but it was delivered in one month. The fix takes half a day (to disassemble and re-assemble the keyboard; the fix itself takes seconds.) No special tools are required: only a few screw drivers, and lots of patience and attention.

 

If you pay somebody to do this, the cost can easily be 2-3 hundred bucks as it takes a lot of time to disassemble/assemble the keyboard, even for professionals.

 

EDIT: Of course it is entirely possible that your issue is caused by a different problem (e.g. just dust). But given how cheap these replacement contact pads are, and how much time it takes to disassemble and re-assemble the piano, it makes a total sense to have them in hand before attempting the disassembly.

 

Edited by puslar123

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