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      Make Sure You are Using Firmware Version 1.13   02/22/2016

      Important Reminder: Make sure your PX-5S is updated to firmware version 1.13. Click the post title above to be taken to a video that will show you how to check your firmware version, where to get the firmware, and how to install the update if needed. 
         
Fenderbridge

A#5 acting strange

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Good day!  First post here!

My PX-5S is out of warranty, so I had no qualms about opening 'er right up.  

 

Long and short of it is, when I hit the A#5 key at about a 100 - 127 velocity, the note registers as a key press on and immediately off.  So I press the key hard, and the grand piano sound goes "tink" when I hold it down, instead of going "TIIIIIiiiiiinnnnnnnnn--".  It's as if I tap the key and let go really quick.

After the "tink" noise, if I let go, it'll make the same noise again, "tink".   Again, the "tink" is just the sound that the piano voice makes (and I did try more than one voice), not the keybed itself.  Essentially, if I 100-127 it, it doesn't register as a sustained note, but rather as a quick tap, and then registers again when I let go.  It's a very, VERY odd situation.

 

So, I opened 'er up, blew her out, and same deal, no fixy.  So I am at a bit of a loss here.

 

I removed all of the screws, bringing out the keybed en masse, and for the absolute life of me, I am unable to figure out how to remove the A#5 key, or any other key for that matter.  There aren't any other screws to be removed, and the only thing I can think of is prying apart the "spine" holding the key in at the first fulcrum at the top of the key, but I'm afraid that may break it.  and if I break that plastic, I'd have to replace the entire plastic keybed (not keys), and I'm sure that'd be a special type of hell to replace.

 

I looked all over the forum, all over youtube and google trying to figure out the best way to remove or replace a key on a PX-5S, but didn't find a thing.  I even looked for the PX-530 since apparently they have the same mechanism, but no dice.  I looked at other brands tear-down videos, but casio is proprietary in the way that their keys go in, so no luck there.

 

I spoke with Casio tech support, and they pointed me to this forum.  I am sure one of you guys have torn down a PX-5S before.

 

Thanks ahead for the help, I have a big show on Friday :)

 

 

EDIT**

 

Looks like I'm not the only one.  Thanks to John Pittas on the facebook forum for PX-5S for sharing the video.  This is the exact thing that happens to me, same key, too.

 

 

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Hi Fenderbridge - really sorry you're having this problem, and I can't contribute to the "how to remove/repair a key", but as a puzzle solver,

I have two questions:

 

1)  Does this happen with no cables connected to the PX-5S (other than power)?

 

2)  I'm wondering what the MIDI Output from the PX-5S looks like when you're hearing that "key-down/key-up double-TINK" sound?  You could see the MIDI messages by connecting to a computer via USB (or via the 5-pin DIN into a MIDI interface) and running (for example on a Mac) 'MIDI Monitor' (MIDI-OX should do this on a PC).

 

Not trying to make things more complex for you - but sometimes a bit more info helps.

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1) I'd say no, mostly because I'm not the only one having this exact same problem.

2) I'm sure the MIDI messages sent would register a double key.

I figured out how to get in to under the keybed, I am just going to try and replace the part myself, that should do it.

 

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There is a trick to removing the key, but its been awhile, I'm fuzzy remembering exactly (on my PX350 which has the same key structure inside). You must have clearance to be able to pull the key forward and up, and when you put it back in, it feels even trickier to get it back because of the structure of the rear of the key underneath. I discovered this by accident, as one of my keys had popped out and up about 1/2" and i thought it was broken .i remember it took some doing to get it back just right. A single key can be removed though. I had the entire keybed out when i did it, not a n easy job as you have probably already discovered. The key clicks in place once it is removed, at least that's as clear as i remember.

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I am having the same problem on A#5. Not so much the cutoff, but definitely the double-strike upon release at higher velocity.  I bought my PX5S used in March 2016 (out of warranty); this problem began in August.

 

Suspecting some dust or foreign object had somehow gotten into the sensor, I took the keyboard apart and completely cleaned the rubber/vinyl contact and the circuit board using compressed air and CRC Electronic Cleaner.  The first time I thought I solved the problem, because it was fine for about 2 weeks.  (I play full-time in local clubs, and use the PX5S 2-4 times weekly,  Yamaha S90ES or CP30 on the rest of the gigs).

However, the double-strike returned. I again took apart the keyboard and cleaned the sensors, but this time it did not stop the problem.  I suspect the contact may not be seating properly into the circuit board, or it is worn and now responds erratically.

 

Also, the B5 note has begun to stick on occasion.

 

Unless someone has a better idea, when I have time I'll open it up again, and see if I can switch the suspect contact strip with another on the lower part of the keyboard.  If I can, and there's any difference, I'll let y'all know and post photos/video.

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From all the information I have gleaned from here and from the facebook forum, I am pretty sure I can say that the A#5 is just a faulty key.  Surely, there is a way to fix it...I'm sure of it...rather than replacing the whole damn logic board, right?

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Hey, I have the exact same problem! I'm (slightly) relieved to see that others do too, because maybe there's an agreed-upon fix. Mine also is an A#, but is 3 octaves lower. I happen to still be in warranty, but I'm not sure how I'd deal with not having the unit if I were to send it in to be fixed. On the other hand, I'm willing to take it apart myself and void the remaining 3 months of warranty if there were clear instructions on how to do so. 

Any comments by official reps?

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Has anyone tried simply blowing out the space between the problem keys?  No need to disassemble for that.

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21 minutes ago, BradMZ said:

Has anyone tried simply blowing out the space between the problem keys?  No need to disassemble for that.

Yes, and this did not work.  It was one of the first things I tried.

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That's my video above. I just got the board back from the repair shop, and the problem is fixed. The repair description reads: "Replaced rubber contact containing specific key. Cleaned contact PCB under specific key. Tested all keys for proper triggering." I hope that's the last of my keybed problems for a while. I have now spent a third of the purchase price on repairs. My bank select button is acting up, too; half the time it doesn't register. I hope it's not on it's way out; it looks like others have a similar problem based on recent posts in the FB group.

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Very...interesting...

If the fix is genuinely to repair the contact, then that should be easy enough to do at home.  They make conductive repair kits just for this, so I think I'll look into that.

 

Thanks for the help, JPKeys!

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Yep, I'm having the same problem with the Bb key almost 2 octaves above middle C, so that is probably the same key.  Weird that it is the same key for everybody.  I'd love to hear a good answer because it is driving me crazy!!  I find myself avoiding playing this key all the time now.  Wow, your posts are from 2016 and it is now September 2017.  Did anybody get a solution??

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Simply blow in between the keys from both sides. It may take a few tries and a good strong puff but we've seen this fix these single key issues without any need to disassemble.  Never take one of these units apart until you have tried air. 

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