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Jelimon

Replacing the hammer on the Px-100

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I bought a second-hand (possibly third) Privia from someone a few days ago. After some practicing at home, many of the keys have sunken in. Feeling brave, I took the thing apart and had little bits of the hammer fall off (they are small and black, and seem to control the bounce in the keys). After speaking with Casio tech, it seems like it's either I pay another $500 to have them come and replace and repair the whole thing, or i buy a replacement keyboard part from them and DIY. Has anyone experienced this before? TIA

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I might be able to help, if you could be a little more specific. I am the crazy guy who tore apart his px350 to rebuild parts of the key assembly-it is not an easy task, but you may be able to repair this depending upon what exactly is happening.You will find my posted pictures in the PX350 section here.

 

I believe you are describing the small weights that are attached to the ends of a metal arm structure, colored black in my px350. This is the fulcrum arm that provides some resistance to the key when played. There are small counterweights on the ends of these arms that provide the "weighted" feel of the keys. If these have fallen out, you could refasten these with a strong epoxy or maybe even "crazy glue"  and you may be able to do this without dis-assembling the entire keyboard although I've not taken apart a px100. If the damage goes further than this, i agree a total keyboard assembly would probably need to be installed, a very big job and I wouldn't recommend it unless you have alot of experience with this type of thing. As far as a newer Casio, the least expensive I could find runs around $300,00 new. This was a PX200 I purchased for a student and it is a beautiful instrument, well made, gorgeous piano sounds and excellent weighted action. I'm sure a replacement key assembly would be pretty expensive and the installation if DIY would take quite a few hours even if you are experienced doing this type of work-the entire keyboard must be taken a apart to get the key assembly out as one piece, not fun. If you can sell the px100 for parts you might get some of your money back. 

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