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LSI is simply an integrated circuit logic chip family.  It literally means Large Scale Integrated Circuit.  All that means is it has a certain number of active components or more per square cm on the chip surface.  Typically numbering in the tens and hundreds of millions.

 

ie.  a LSI or VLSI chip typically contains anywhere from a few million to a few hundred million transistors.

 

What those chips are applied to depends on the intentions of the engineering departments who designed them.

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Just as a historical note, Wendy Carlos used to be Walter Carlos. He transgendered him/herself in the 80's.

I believe s/he actually started the process the year Switched-On Bach was released (1968). The record company didn't reveal this until 1979, long after the gender change was complete, when they released Switched-On Brandenburgs, the first of her albums to say Wendy Carlos on the cover. That was also the same year she did the famous Playboy interview.

I have two copies of Switched-On Bach, one well played and the other virgin, the Well-Tempered Synthesizer and a copy of Switched-On Bach II, all on vinyl and all saying Walter Carlos. I also have Switched-On Brandenburgs on vinyl, a two-disc set.

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I had heard of this one. Nice tech for its day. I notice it seems to have a better display than the XW (but then again almost everything has a better display than the XW ;))

Not really. They were pretty much dedicated LCDs, and the graphics were printed on the displays: i.e., the number and intensity of the individual harmonics.

 

We're talking 1985 electronics technology here, so it was nothing stupendous, even for the time.

 

..Joe

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I think if you make a steel case to replace the plastic one, put some lead weights in it to beef it up to say-30-60 pounds and change the name to Y******a, R*********d, N***d, K***g etc. people would be willing to pay 2-4 times this price for it, and it would even sound better to some people-I'm sure a name change and a beefier case would make it sound much better! (LOL)  I agree, it is a very interesting and different approach to integrating many technologies into one keyboard I can hold in my lap (if I had a lap). Despite much other (more expensive) equipment, this is still holding my interest. Nice-why did you take so long after the CZs?

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Hi all, first post here!

 

 

I don't know that I would use the word "exceptional" in regards to the XW-P1: 

 

 

In terms of its numerous features, quality of sounds, and the overall package, especially in its RRP price range when compared with the competition (is there any?), the Casio XW IS exceptional. It's an exceptional value for money and powerful synth that in the market sector it competes in, has virtually no competitor. In this context, the word "exceptional" really does apply to the XW series.  ;)

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Rather hard to apply the word exceptional when there's so many contitions to it being "exceptional." It's exceptional only when you factor in the price range? So does that mean if it were three times the price it would suck? In terms of its features? It's missing aftertouch: for a "performance synth," that's a cardinal sin. It's keyboard is cheap and very noisy. For a "performance synth" that's a cardinal sin." Its processor is way underpowered, meaning many real-time controls aren't.

 

Again, I like mine. I'm starting to have issues with the lack of aftertouch, but it's a very nice synth with some great sounds. That's all. It's a far cry from exceptional. That's a word we bandy about today on far too many things that aren't to justify our purchase and make us feel like if we own something "exceptional," we, to are partly "exceptional." It ain't so, The Korg OASYS was exceptional. The Failrlight was exception. The Synclavier was WAY exceptional. The Prophet 5, The Roland Jupiter 8, the Korg M1, these were exceptional synths.

 

The XW-P1? Not so much.

 

..Joe

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Have to disagree with you Joe, along with your analogies. Take the original Austin Mini car. It is regarded as an exceptional design in terms of its overall packaging, performance, abilities and price. Multiply its price by three, and suddenly it would be trying to compete against cars way above its class. It's an unfair comparison as the value for money and features now look very uncompetitive (it would now 'suck'?). Take it within the automotive class it was aimed at, compare like with like, and its a whole different ballgame. Yes, price does come into it, but we're comparing it with cars in the same league, not those that are much more expensive, more powerful and with more features.

 

Thus take the Casio XW range and the class/ league it is sold in. What other new models in this league come close to the XW's features and performance? For its class and price point, the Casio is an exceptional model (as in 'exception rather than the rule') as it has way more on offer than other equivalent priced models from rival manufacturers. It is an 'exception' to the class it sits in, therefore it is justifiable to call it 'exceptional'. Whether it is a 'classic', that is an entirely different matter and only time will tell if it will ever be regarded as so.

 

Regarding 'aftertouch', yes, that would be nice to have on the XW. However, I believe at least two of the 'exceptional' synths you mentioned lack this feature, as do many other classic synths (MiniMoog, ARP Odyssey, all the analogue Junos, all the analogue Jupiters, Korg MS series, original SC Prophets, Oberheims etc.) That didn't stop them becoming classics and also being regarded as 'exceptional'. Nor did it stop them from being extensively used both in the studio and live.

 

I'm under no delusions as to my XW, and with a large collection of Casios from small 'toys' (VL1, PT 80, MT68 etc.) right up to older Casio flagships (CZ-1, VZ1, FZ20M, HT6000, MZ2000) I have no need to justify my purchase. I bought it because there was nothing else in that class of synths that could match the XW's all round abilities, I like the sounds it can produce and I just like Casios and their underdog reputation. It's a great synth for what it is (and should be taken as), and that is all that matters to me.  :)

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Actually if aftertouch is such a big deal to anyone perhaps they should simply invest in a MIDI controller keyboard with aftertouch and use it to drive the XW-P1.  I believe the XW-P!'s programs do respond to MIDI aftertouch signals so problem solved.

 

Then again, even a dumb controller with aftertouch would probably set you back more than you paid for the XW in the first place so that should give you thought as to how much adding aftertouch would have added to the XW's price in the first place :P:D

 

Gary

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Well, I'm sure all of the things people would love to have in a synth is very possible. The only issue would be; who would buy these big $$$ instruments? Only users with big $$$ that's who. Not many would sell, then out they go.

 

No one is going to produce a $10K synth and sell it for $600. It would be cool if someone did, but, not going to happen in my lifetime.

 

Reminds me of an old Steven Seagal movie where the badguy says: Everyone want to go to heaven, but no one want to die!

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Chas, expandng your analogy out, then in a room full of ugly girls, the least ugly is now "exceptionally" beautiful. :D

 

Look, all I'm saying is that you can' make something conditionally exceptional. It's like saying something is "completely" or "really" unique: unique means "one of a kind," so how can something be completely or really one of a kind? Either it's one of a kind (exceptional) or it isn't. Something is either exceptional regardless of modifiers, or it isn't.

 

And my statement on aftertouch holds. You cannot have a "performance" synth without the tools for performance. Granted, the synths I quoted might not have had aftertouch, but aftertouch didn't exist then. They also don't have sampling, VA, granular synthesis, and additive synthesis. (Excepting the Fairlight and Synclavier for sampling.) Go ahead, play the lead from Genesis' "In The Cage" solo on the XW and and have the LFO kick in when you need it. Oh, don't forget: the left hand is playing chords on the organ, so it isn't available to use a mod wheel....

 

A fully-blown Synclavier was $500,000.00 US. IF - as you say - price is a factor, does that no longer make it exceptional? See, if you're going to factor in price, you have to factor it in for everything. can't use it for one and not the other- your argument becomes specious.

 

And as to the Austin Mini: no. Not exceptional. Two words: Volkswagen Beetle.

 

Gary: If someone has to invest in a controller with aftertouch, then the total cost of the XW climbs, taking it out of its inexpensive price range and putting it up with the bigger boys. (Most of the cheap controllers don't have aftertouch- that's why they're cheap.) I have a lot of synths- The Kronos 88 has aftertouch, the Kurz K2500 has aftertouch. the Yamaha KX88 controller has aftertouch, the XV-88 has aftertouch. Of course I could use any one of those, though I haven't yet found if the XW responds to aftertouch. That's not the point: It's the - again - fanboy style of excitement proclaiming that this synth is "exceptional." Where's the exceptional piano samples? Where's the exceptional clonewheel? Where's the exceptional Leslie sim? It has these sounds: would anyone call them exceptional? Something either IS exceptional or it ISN'T It can't be a little "exceptional": that's like being a "little" pregnant...

 

And I don't just apply this to the Casio: I desperately wanted to like the Roland Jupiter-50, and ran to the music store when it came out, drooling with the thought of a new Jupiter, but I apply the same argument about aftertouch to it as I do the XW, except it's a two-thousand dollar synth! I cut Roland even less slack than I do Casio, as I understand the price-cutting in a 500 dollar synth, but a synth that costs two grand? I walked out without it, and won't go near one again.

 

Maybe it's because I'm a musician, not just a player, I studied classical piano for 16 years, was a performance piano major in college, and the performance is the thing. Sounds are nice, but without the ability to play them musically, they're just noise. Without the ability of a synth to make something musically - covering ALL the capabilities of music - it's just a sound box...

 

And thus NOT exceptional.

 

..Joe

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Joe, again, like everyone else in this thread, I believe you are being hypercritical about the definition of "exceptional."  This argument has degenerated into a battle of semantics and little else.

 

An instrument can be deemed exceptional without costing a half a million $$$ to build.

 

For instance, the original Moog Synths sold for a few thou, had 3 octave keyboards, no velocity and no aftertouch, yet weren't they "exceptional?"  They were certainly seminal devices which earned themselves a permanent spot in all the record books.

 

Likewise the Micromoog which sold for about $200 at Radio Shack.  With a 2.5 octave organ style keyboard and nothing else to distinguish themselves except their low price point they introduced an entire generation to electronic music making.

 

http://www.synthmania.com/micromoog.htm

 

Also Yamaha's DX-7.  The sounds are laughable by today's standards, yet it was a staple of every early 80's new wave band.

 

http://www.vintagesynth.com/yamaha/dx7.php

 

So when we say the XW-P1 is exceptional, then yes, price IS a factor.  It is an instrument again capable of introducing an entirely new generation to electronic music production at a price which any kid with a paper route can afford to buy.

 

Do I think the XW line is a landmark synth in electronic music development?  Yes I do and only history can prove either of us right or wrong on this one.

 

ex·cep·tion·al  [ik-sep-shuh-nl]
adjective
1. forming an exception or rare instance; unusual; extraordinary: The warm weather was exceptional for January.
2. unusually excellent; superior: an exceptional violinist.
3. Education.
a. being intellectually gifted.
b. being physically or especially mentally handicapped to an extent that special schooling is required.

 

 

I believe you are too hung up on the second definition of the word while we are all supporting the first in this discussion.

 

An instrument CAN be exceptional without being a priceless work of art in and of itself.

 

Gary

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This is extracted and translated from the dictionary of the Royal Academy of the Spanish language:
 
exceptional.

1 adj. That is except for the common rule.

2 adj. That moves you away from the ordinary, or occurring rarely.
 
I say that the XW-P1 is exceptional for its quality, price and power. I have discovered that it's a versatile instrument.
 
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Guys (and gals, should there be any here), a rose by any other name would still smell as sweet and prick you with its thorns. Debating semantics does not change what the XW is or what it can do. And indirectly calling people "fanboys" isn't constructive, I will add.

I would challenge those that find the XW-P1 disappointing in whatever way (and I myself have not shied away from pointing out its various deficiencies, you may note) to come up with techniques to get the most out of it, including workarounds for those deficiencies should any exist, and to post the information here in this forum. That's why it exists. Let's not waste time debating existential points about a keyboard that we all agree was worth sinking a bit of our hard-earned cash into.

For instance, to make up for the XW's lack of aftertouch you could hook up a MIDI expression pedal (not directly to the XW of course, since it can't accept one - another deficiency!) and control whatever you were going to control with aftertouch (usually either filter cutoff or modulation amount). No, it's not the same but I have heard many musicians say they prefer using a foot pedal. So let's drop the moaning about aftertouch, please. Casio knows we want it in a future model.

'Nuff said. I'm off right now to FINALLY try out Mike Martin's new iPad app on the P1.

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I think the P1 is kinda "jack of all trades". It gives you a little bit of everything: sequencer, monophonic synth with kinda deep synthesis, a HexLayer polyphonic sound with kinda not-so-deep synthesis, drawbar organ, and the rest... It introduced me to electronic keyboards and I learned a lot from it, and it gave me a direction where I want to progress later. And I will tell only one of my biggest issue with P1, and that is the quality of the keyboard, it feels a little "cheap". 

 

I don't know if this keyboard is exceptional or not, it is irrelevant to argue over that right now. Maybe in 10 years or so.

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Joe, I am in agreement with HappyRat1. You appear to be getting hung up on the definition, or rather the interpretation, of the word "exceptional".

 

 

"Chas, expandng your analogy out, then in a room full of ugly girls, the least ugly is now "exceptionally" beautiful. :D"

 

A poor analogy. Think of it more like a CLASS of students, say year 3. One student in this class is 'exceptionally' good at all subjects compared with their peers. This student can also do much more than is normally expected of a year 3 student. That makes this student 'exceptional' in their class. Now, compare this year 3 student with a year 8 student, and they don't appear exceptional at all. But that is totally unjust comparing a year 3 student with a year 8 student, because you expect a year 8 student to be better all round than a year 3 student. What you don't expect is a year 3 student getting close to the standards of those in years 4 and 5. Think of the Casio XW as a year 3 student, and a Jupiter 80 as a year 8 student. For its class, the XW IS "exceptional" compared with the standards normally expected of it.

 

"Look, all I'm saying is that you can' make something conditionally exceptional. It's like saying something is "completely" or "really" unique: unique means "one of a kind," so how can something be completely or really one of a kind? Either it's one of a kind (exceptional) or it isn't. Something is either exceptional regardless of modifiers, or it isn't."

 

The Casio XW is "exceptional" in its class!

 

"And my statement on aftertouch holds. You cannot have a "performance" synth without the tools for performance. Granted, the synths I quoted might not have had aftertouch, but aftertouch didn't exist then."

 

Aftertouch (polyphonic) was available on the Yamaha CS80, released in 1976... And many great live synth players managed to perform fine without this feature - Rick Wakeman, Tony Banks, Jean Michel-Jarre, Billy Currie, Geddy Lee, Howard Jones, Herbie Hancock, Vince Clark, Gary Numan etc. etc.!

 

"They also don't have sampling, VA, granular synthesis, and additive synthesis. (Excepting the Fairlight and Synclavier for sampling.) Go ahead, play the lead from Genesis' "In The Cage" solo on the XW and and have the LFO kick in when you need it. Oh, don't forget: the left hand is playing chords on the organ, so it isn't available to use a mod wheel...."

 

"In the cage" was released in 1974. Apparently prior to any synths having aftertouch. Your point is?

 

"A fully-blown Synclavier was $500,000.00 US. IF - as you say - price is a factor, does that no longer make it exceptional? See, if you're going to factor in price, you have to factor it in for everything. can't use it for one and not the other- your argument becomes specious."

 

Disagree. Price often equals the class that the instrument is in. A Casio VL1 is an "exceptional" synth. So is an EDP Wasp. So is a Stylophone. However, you have to compare like with like, and these baby synths don't become less "exceptional" if you were to compare them with a Jupiter 8 or an OBX. As per my classroom analogy above, you rate them against peers in the same class and for their overall design and features.

 

And as to the Austin Mini: no. Not exceptional. Two words: Volkswagen Beetle.

 

Sorry, but many, many automotive historians would completely disagree with you that the Austin Mini is not exceptional. In fact, here's four words for you. "Car of the Century":

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_of_the_Century

 

The Mini is rated at number two (after the Model T Ford). The Beetle, though a well built car and with hugely successful sales, is number 4. The Beetle used an old design (separate chassis, air cooled engine, rear wheel drive, torsion bar suspension), whereas the Mini set the trend of a two box design with wheel at each corner (for maximum space efficiency), with a transverse watercooled engine and front wheel drive. The majority of the current cars in Europe, and much of the World, owe their basic design to the original Mini, not the Beetle. The Mini took a new approach to small car design. As a package, in its class, it was hard to beat.

 

"Gary: If someone has to invest in a controller with aftertouch, then the total cost of the XW climbs, taking it out of its inexpensive price range and putting it up with the bigger boys. (Most of the cheap controllers don't have aftertouch- that's why they're cheap.) I have a lot of synths- The Kronos 88 has aftertouch, the Kurz K2500 has aftertouch. the Yamaha KX88 controller has aftertouch, the XV-88 has aftertouch. Of course I could use any one of those, though I haven't yet found if the XW responds to aftertouch. That's not the point: It's the - again - fanboy style of excitement proclaiming that this synth is "exceptional." Where's the exceptional piano samples? Where's the exceptional clonewheel? Where's the exceptional Leslie sim? It has these sounds: would anyone call them exceptional? Something either IS exceptional or it ISN'T It can't be a little "exceptional": that's like being a "little" pregnant..."

 

Again, I refer you back to the class comparison analogy above. The Casio XW is no-where near in the same league as synths you just mentioned. It is exceptional in its class. Much the same as you wouldn't complain that a MiniMoog isn't exceptional compared with the above because it doesn't have after touch and it's only monophonic. 

 

"And I don't just apply this to the Casio: I desperately wanted to like the Roland Jupiter-50, and ran to the music store when it came out, drooling with the thought of a new Jupiter, but I apply the same argument about aftertouch to it as I do the XW, except it's a two-thousand dollar synth! I cut Roland even less slack than I do Casio, as I understand the price-cutting in a 500 dollar synth, but a synth that costs two grand? I walked out without it, and won't go near one again."

 

To me, this kind of kills your after touch debate. A $2000 synth doesn't come with after-touch, yet you bemoan the fact that a sub $500 synth doesn't also? Do ANY sub $500 synths come with after touch? (I do not know the answer to this - after-touch hasn't been that much of a priority to me). Are you not expecting too much from such a bargain synth? Of my rather large collection of Casios, only four of them have after touch, and all were flagship models costing more 10 - 30 years ago than the XW costs TODAY! They are: CZ1, VZ1, MZ2000 and the CT6000. The CZ1 and VZ1 were aimed very much at the pro market, and the MZ2000 and CT6000 aimed at the top end home market. I will be the first to agree that all four feel much more substantially made than the XW with nicer feeling keyboards (even the 1984 CT6000), but they were aimed at different markets. If I had bought them new, I would think twice about gigging with them for two reasons - 1. their value when new (risk of theft and damage 'on the road'), and 2. their weight and size. The XW was designed as an affordable, powerful and easily portable instrument. One that a gigging musician wouldn't think twice, nor worry, about gigging with. It's also tougher than it looks, and its light weight would be beneficial as most more expensive synths seem to get damage when they are accidentally dropped, and their sheer weight is what causes them to break.

 

Maybe it's because I'm a musician, not just a player, I studied classical piano for 16 years, was a performance piano major in college, and the performance is the thing. Sounds are nice, but without the ability to play them musically, they're just noise. Without the ability of a synth to make something musically - covering ALL the capabilities of music - it's just a sound box...

 

And do any real (as in string, not digital) pianos come with after-touch? That doesn't stop them from being an exceptional instrument in the right hands  ;)

 

To conclude, I still believe that the Casio XW is an exceptional synth in its class as it has no real peers. Until someone can show me another synth with similar capabilities competing in the same market sector, I will continue to believe that.  B)

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Offhand I'd have to say there are a handful of synths out there directly competing with the XW-P1 at this price point.

 

These include the Roland Gaia SH-01

 

http://www.amazon.com/Roland-SH-01-GAIA-Synthesizer/dp/B003IJ9DSK/ref=pd_sim_sbs_MI_4

 

The Microkorg XL +

 

http://www.amazon.com/Korg-MKXL-microKORG-XL-Standard/dp/B00969BGJ0/ref=sr_1_3?s=musical-instruments&ie=UTF8&qid=1382917524&sr=1-3&keywords=microkorg+xl

 

The M-Audio Venom

 

http://www.amazon.com/M-Audio-Venom-Synthesizer-Compatible-Interface/dp/B004J96JTO/ref=sr_1_1?s=musical-instruments&ie=UTF8&qid=1382917601&sr=1-1&keywords=m-audio+venom

 

And the Novation Ultranova

 

http://www.amazon.com/Novation-Ultranova-Series-Analog-Modeling-Synthesizer/dp/B004EF86QM/ref=sr_1_2?s=musical-instruments&ie=UTF8&qid=1382917641&sr=1-2&keywords=m-audio+venom

 

These synths all have mfg's list prices around the $500 to $600 mark and are all aimed at pretty much the same pro musicians.

 

By comparison the XW's are exceptional in that they offer way more bang for the buck than any of them.  None of them offers aftertouch and as Chas stated, you'd be hard pressed to find that feature on any keyboard selling below $1200 - $1500.

 

Personally I own a venom as well as an XW-P1 but the only reason I bought one was because M-Audio planned to discontinue them last year and they were clearing out for $189 on Amazon.  All in all it's a fun little synth but the build quality of the keyboard REALLY sucks, it drops notes like nobody's business so I only play it thru my PC3K8 as a controller and treat it as a module, and as far as the programmability of the synth goes it's pretty much useless without the windows based editor.

 

Like I said, I bought the venom because it was a bargain I couldn't pass up, but truth be told I get far more practical use from my Kurzweil and my XW-P1...

 

I also owned a Microkorg XL before I bought my XW and sold it off to pay for the Casio.  I haven't regretted that decision for a heartbeat..  Compared to the Casio the Microkorg was the REAL toy.

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For instance, to make up for the XW's lack of aftertouch you could hook up a MIDI expression pedal (not directly to the XW of course, since it can't accept one - another deficiency!) 

A MIDI expression pedal  is no problem at all, they will happily connect directly to the MIDI IN port. It's a volume expression pedal that the XW's will not accept directly without a MIDI solutions-type box. The FCB1010 has two pedals that can handle just about any function - volume, aftertouch, modulation.. And the switches can trigger notes, arpeggios and move the patches changes up or down. 

111634-8390144268b44f4d6e81897248fedda2.

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You caught me, Scott. I spoke imprecisely. I meant that you could not hook up an ANALOG expression pedal directly to the XW, something many people have taken Casio to task for. (BTW, if the next XW model does not accept one we will whip the Casio product planners with a virtual wet noodle as punishment.) You would have to connect such a pedal to a MIDI encoder like the MIDI Solutions box, which is what I should have said instead of saying "MIDI expression pedal" as shorthand.

Or you could use something like the FCB1010, which takes care of all that internally (its two pedals, after all, contain pots like all expression and volume pedals). But, of course, there IS nothing else like the FCB1010. I have searched for alternatives and there doesn't seem to be any.

BTW, as an admin I'm sure you must have seen the topic I started a few months back in which I enquired about using the FCB1010 with the XW (http://www.casiomusicforums.com/index.php?/topic/4463-correct-way-to-connect-midi-solutions-pedal-controller/). I not only know about the FCB1010 but am familiar, at least superficially, with its capabilities. But if you summarized it for the benefit of other readers to help counter the damage my woefully imprecise language may have caused, then I fully understand. :D

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You caught me, Scott. I spoke imprecisely. I meant that you could not hook up an ANALOG expression pedal directly to the XW, something many people have taken Casio to task for. (BTW, if the next XW model does not accept one we will whip the Casio product planners with a virtual wet noodle as punishment.) You would have to connect such a pedal to a MIDI encoder like the MIDI Solutions box, which is what I should have said instead of saying "MIDI expression pedal" as shorthand.

Or you could use something like the FCB1010, which takes care of all that internally (its two pedals, after all, contain pots like all expression and volume pedals). But, of course, there IS nothing else like the FCB1010. I have searched for alternatives and there doesn't seem to be any.

BTW, as an admin I'm sure you must have seen the topic I started a few months back in which I enquired about using the FCB1010 with the XW (http://www.casiomusicforums.com/index.php?/topic/4463-correct-way-to-connect-midi-solutions-pedal-controller/). I not only know about the FCB1010 but am familiar, at least superficially, with its capabilities. But if you summarized it for the benefit of other readers to help counter the damage my woefully imprecise language may have caused, then I fully understand. :D

 

Spoken like a true statesmen!  :)  Yes I saw that post a while back - and yes I was clarifying for the benefit of those who haven't read back that far. 

The FCB1010 is one-of-kind and looks like it would be very useful for those who need volume/aftertouch/mod via a pedal.. the other functions are really icing on the cake, IMO. I would love to put the FCB1010 pedal system thru it's paces on the XW and PX-5S, but I really don't have much use for it beyond research purposes - my gigs are just not that demanding - so I can't really justify the purchase. I was really hoping by now someone had tried it with one of the Casios and reported back.  

There are quite a few on Ebay for a good price - I may end up biting the bullet and taking one for the team.  :P 

 

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OK I just ran a quick experiment with spectacular results!

 

I patched my Kurzweil PC3K8 to run as a MIDI controller to my XW-P1 and the volume pedal works fine on all programs as well as aftertouch controlling modulation on the PCM sounds and the Drawbar Organs.  It doesn't seem to work on the Solo Synths or Hex Layers out of the box, but nonetheless the Casio engineers were at least smart enough to include aftertouch modulation into half of the programs.

 

So Joe, that should solve your problems with the XW.  Just plug in your Kurzweil or your KX88 and enjoy a full range of modulated aftertouch on your 7 octave keyboards.

 

Personally I don't like to beat up too hard on my keys and rarely make use of aftertouch, but if you are looking for your expressive muse there it is :)

 

Gary

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K folks. Live in your little workd of "exceptional." Use your XW for solo piano work, Hammond leads, whatever you want, and continue to dilute the language by applying words that mean nothing ion to what they relate. Yes I take the language seriously; it's how we communitcate in a concise and specific manner, You can live by applying marketing hype language to everything you want to, I'll continue to look at things realistically. Perhaps it's because I'm a pilot: I can't take anything easy when I'm in my plane and the only thing between me and a fiery ball is me using the correct logic and specific thought processes to make sure that big fan out front is keeping me cool. The XW ISN'T and exceptional synth. Hell, my K2500 isn't an exceptional synth, and the XW isn't a pimple on the ass of a gnat on the K2500.

 

One good thing from all your fanboy attitudes, though: you convinced me that the XW needs to go. If I'm willing to be so forceful about its shortcomings, it really has no place in my rack. When (if) Casio fixes the issues I have with the weak processor, puts decent bread-and-butter samples in it, gives it a musicans's keyboard, not a bunch of people that just bang on keys, then maybe it's something I can come back to. I wouldn't own anything before the CZ-1 because they were too early in the development of PD synths, and perhaps I jumped the gun on this one, thinking Casio would have developed a more complete synth for the marketplace.

 

And I'm sorry if I offend any one withe the fanboy words, but to quote all of you, aren't you being a little too rigid with the definition of "fanboy"? Or is it simply that you're allowed to interpret words however you want, and I am not. But honestly- you all DO sound like a bunch of fanboys with your overwhelming praise for what is a modest little synth and nothing more. It can't be the only synth in your arsenal, so it desn't even stand up to a 10 year old Yamaha Motif, Korg Triton, or even a Roland JV-1080. All y'all just sit there jerking off all over youselves because you have a little noisebox with a step sequencer that means you don't have to learn to actually play the keys.

 

And you're entitled to. But I need a musician's tool, not a wannabe's tool.

 

I'm done here. With the XW leaving, there won't be much of a reason to come back. However, it it's such an exceptional synth for all of you, 

 

..Joe

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Joe, don't let the door hit your ass on the way out.

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