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Hello forum, I should not comment on a member leaving in a huff, but I think this need;s to be said.  This is supposed to be a kid friendly site,after all  the xw's were marketed in some arena's for young people.The former member's frequent references to masturbation and urinating demonstrate's that this person doesn't have presence of mind to curb his language when need be. He tried to bully his opinion's  on everyone. Frankly I found his view point   inaccurate, narrow, and tired.   This little post is mainly for the young people on the forum. Show the world how exceptional you, and your xw-p1,g1,px5s really are.

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A hammer can build or destroy, depending upon who's holding it, right? I have become very visible within this forum because I detected a strong group of  intelligent and talented people who happened to be sharing a common interest. I have learned more about this instrument because of the people here and their level of expertise and dedication, period. I use my avatar for a reason-to remind me "the present day composer refuses to die". And-"most people wouldn't know good music if it came up and bit them on the ass!" But that didn't stop Zappa. Bach composed so many of his keyboard works partially because the even-tempered scale was (somewhat) perfected in his lifetime-now he could play through key signatures that were impossible before his time, must have been quite a revelation, thus the "Inventions". (That plus there were around 100 other Bachs all over Europe working on the same stuff, quite a family.) Beethoven used dynamics so well because the piano became touch sensitive in a usable way, must have been quite a trip from the crappy keyboards before that time. Vladimir Horowitz, the great Russian piano virtuoso stated in an interview that part of his creativity came from his ability to disguise his mistakes when playing a piece (imagine-he must have been good at it!) What's my point? Usually the greatest creativity comes from pushing the "accepted" limitations and squeezing the cr*** out of them! The technical developments even in just the last 20 years have been so outrageous-and yet performing venues are still so limited at least around me, (but then I live in the woods). These forums are birthplaces of new "stars" in the universe and a new developing venue for performances and support which is greatly needed in my opinion. How many talented musicians in this country can't even make a living and give up regardless of what ax or style they play, I've met plenty, its a real challenge-when I saw some of the top players in the business (I lived near NYC) doing weddings along side me years ago I knew we were in trouble!  When I was teaching and gigging out, I consistently used maybe 12-24 or so sounds with my keys, and I was covering arrangements from the 50s to 90s. Most of my audiences could care less whether I used a 24-bit of 8-bit sound. as long as I didn't scare them away from the bar (we did that once with a ring modulator and a hammond B-3 through 2 Leslies during an ELP fiasco) Like Zappa said, most people can't tell the difference between a Steinway and a weaselfart. There are people that can (of course here in this forum) but I never had anyone come up to me after or during a gig and say "wow" I really liked that sample of the Eb shlagendorf horn you played in measure 14 of the "Sonata for a Lonely Meatcake". I love the XWP1 because it's challenging to figure out how to play it, sort of like an alien picking up a saxophone and trying to get it to make any kind of noise but would probably take a little guesswork and could lead to some interesting results, I leave that to your imagination. Any of these "keystations"  (my own term) or software can do things musically even Zappa needed a Synclavier to do, and it took days to set up sounds and samples. Enough said.

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Gawd, glad to see that resolve itself in such an expectedly dramatic matter.

Everyone who is still left probably agrees that the XW is by pretty much any definition "exceptional", yet I don't really see any fanboys here- people are more than willing to point out the XW's many failings.

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The topic of this post is: what is a XW-P1?

-For some people it is an exceptional tool.
-For some people it is a well thought out tool, but with faults.
-For some people it is a powerful toy for beginners.
-For some people it is a mistake of technology.
-For some people it is a useless tool for their work.
-For some people it is a decorative object.
-For some people it is a marvel of space engineering.
-For some people it is an attempt of synthesizer.
-For some people it is a grey and orange colored plastic with simple sounds.
-For some people it is a very professional tool.
-For some people it is a synthesizer that brings freshness to the world of music.

^_^ There are endless thoughts about tastes of an XW. ^_^

 

;) Every human being is free to comment. ;)

Edited by David
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Yes David I agree. An instrument is like music itself; very subjective.

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I certainly know that there are many good musician using anything that mildly looks out of the ordinary to create great music or use its "exceptional"

sound for the magic that is music I would say look at those thing would be more then enough.

 

The Vl1 for the da da da song. etc. 

 

Hey I even seen my favorite keyboardist legend Jordan Rudess from dream theater who owns a XW-P1 to between all of his synth that says something.

 

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Good point. Musicianship is in the musician, not in his or her instrument. Great players can coax appropriately musical sounds out of anything. Just like a pro golfer could I am sure play a great round of golf using some rusty set of clubs picked up at a garage sale. Or play a good round with only a seven iron, as so humorously portrayed by Kevin Costner in "Tin Cup." 

 

But myself, I don't care if someone here knows how to _really_ play a keyboard or not. If they only _dream_ of playing one but would like to talk about it, that's enough for me. Even Craig Anderton admitted in his seminal Pro review of the P1 on Harmony Central that he wasn't a great keyboard player:

 

Guitar is my primary instrument, I'm a "MIDI keyboardist" if you know what I mean...although the examples of me playing were real time, so at least I'm not terrible.

 

A humble guy - he's probably better than he is letting on there. But in fact you don't have to play great to make music. Granted if you're going to do it in front of people live then you better practice up! But if you're composing in a home studio (as I'm sure most of us are) the tools nowadays make it easy to create music without needing a lot of "talent." Or should I say, they don't get in the way. Your own creativity is the only impediment.

 

I have a lot of respect for people who not only compose their only music but post it in a public forum like this one for all to hear. They're not afraid to expose their babies to possible ridicule. And I'll bet they don't profess themselves to be _real players_ or Gods of the Keyboard.

 

Myself, I'm a "MIDI" keyboardist too. I'd like to get better but right now I can play just well enough (or badly enough :D) to enter lines in semi-real-time into a MIDI sequencer. But that's good enough for what I like to do, which is to recreate classic synth-driven songs from the eighties. I like the challenge of recreating the sounds, rhythms and melodies of that era. It turns out that they fit right in with what the XW-P1 is good at, too.

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