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AP450 sound sampled from ... ?

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Well it's safe to say it's not a Yamaha!  :D

 

I like that!

 

But, what's the actual sample? Casio should use that for their marketing.

 

Or ... is it a secret Casio Grand hidden somewhere, being prep'd for perfection before releasing to the world?

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More often than not, a sampled piano is a Steinway. But a lot of times a keyboard or sample manufacturer will say "German grand." I'm actually surprised when samples say it's a Steinway yet have no relationship with Steinway. I'm not sure what the "rules" are. Perhaps Steinway doesn't mind too much because it's a plug for them and keeps their name out there.

 

You'll notice that some names/brands don't get used in samples, such as Rhodes. The recent incarnation of that company has been somewhat litigious when other people use the name. They even stopped a forum of Rhodes users from using the word Rhodes in the name of their site. Those people loved the Rhodes, and they gave them a hard time. So you'll often see something like "Tine EP" to distinguish it from the Wurlitzer/Reed EP or other EPs.

 

As far what Casio uses, who knows? As long as you like it, that's what matters.

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Good thing Cristofori kept up his work or we'd all be trying to download the latest clavicytherium samples and wondering when the next Arpicembalo was coming out!

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartolomeo_Cristofori

 

Joe so right. After playing some pretty heavy duty grands, at that level they're all astounding to play. Variations are basically that of timbre-brightness variations, characteristics of sustain, slight differences in "feel". The Casio does an amazing job of emulating the experience for me at least. It does sound closer to a Steinway to me as compared to a Bechstein, Yamaha etc. but could be a Bosendorfer-also has that same rich not too strident sound, but not dark. You're lucky with the PX5s-you can adjust eq to pretty much replicate variations in timbre-even the PX350 variations aren't too shabby with preset acoustic tones although being able to fine-tune eq is a definite plus.

 

Hmm.......and check out the list of pianos from the 1720s in the Wikipedia post. One of them is unplayable due to worms eating it up-see why it's important to have a good keyboard cover! And we thought spilled beer and pretzel crumbs were bad. :P:lol:

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Joe's points are dead on. Many times a DP maker doesn't want to say what piano was sampled to avoid licensing issues and even trade secrets. Now, if you look at the XW tone list you can get some hints at what  synths were sampled if you know vintage instruments.  :)

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Just to recap-i have been practicing Mozart and Chopin pieces and it is uncanny how realisitic the PX is, i didn't think a digital would hold up well with classical repertoire but it has for me so far. This is the first digital piano i've played that has the same "weighty" feel and throw of the Steinways I used to practice with, and that's quite an achievement IMO.

 

Before the PX350 existed, i remember spending an entire day in a piano store, playing every piano they had-acoustic and digital, made the salespeople crazy. I was trying to find a digital that sounded as good as the grands there-there weren't any, including the best digital console style Yamahas, Kurzweils, Rolands and (back then) GEM pianos. Somebody must have carefully analyzed the physical characteristics of the Steinway pretty closely to be able to emulate this so well. And the sustain is about as smooth and realisitic as i've ever played.

 

I've read some posts that have complained that the keys are too "heavy" but that is what a full Steinway feels like, it has a heavier feel than most other types of acoustic pianos. I know this sounds like a commercial for Casio but the px350 is the only digital I've played that doesn't give me "ear fatigue" when I practice which is important since it can take hours playing through technique, repertoire and just general noodling around. and then, good grief Charlie Brown, i can carry it under my arm? Unbelievable.

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