AlenK

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AlenK last won the day on April 25

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About AlenK

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  1. Here's a technique that allows continuous control using the modulation wheel of the volume of a Hex Layer tone while you are playing sustained notes (for example). In a Hex Layer tone set the Rate, Delay and Rise parameters of the Amp LFO to zero. Choose any of the pulse waveforms (e.g., Puls3:1) for WaveType. The Depth setting now determines the minimum volume you will hear with the modulation wheel rotated all the way down and Mod Depth determines how much volume will be added to that minimum value when the mod wheel is rotated all the way up. Consequently, Depth should be some large negative value and Mod Depth should be a large positive value. See the table. Parameter Value WaveType Puls3:1 Sync Off Rate 000 Depth (a large negative value) Delay 000 Rise 000 Mod.Depth (a large positive value) The mod wheel can still control the depth of vibrato imparted to the tone by the Pitch LFO, but of course not independently. Using the mod wheel as a volume control is most useful for tones that do not require vibrato and that furthermore don't require both hands for playing notes. Many orchestral sample libraries use the modulation wheel to control the volume and brightness of a tone by crossfading between samples. We can't do that here of course but by mixing a PCM-melody tone in another zone with a much brighter version using a Hex Layer tone in Zone 1, a very similar effect can be obtained. That is an exercise left to the reader. Note: After selecting a Hex Layer tone configured in this way its volume may not correspond to the mod wheel’s actual position. Instead you will hear the volume at the wheels’ minimum position (rotated fully down), which is typically very low. When you move the wheel even a tiny bit the volume will snap to the correct value. If you don’t hear anything when you should, just gently touch the wheel.
  2. One of a series. Oh, I should mention: They're in Polish! Hope you speak that (I don't).
  3. Here’s a little trick to simulate a sample-and-hold effect using the solo-synth LFOs. A sample-and-hold LFO waveform changes in discrete steps rather than continuously (see the diagram). This works on both the XW-P1 and the XW-G1. An example is available here. This technique uses both LFOs. First, choose a narrow pulse for LFO1: Puls1:3. Set its Rate initially to, say, 50 (you will need to adjust it later). Choose either Sin, Tri, SawUp or SawDown for LFO2 and set its rate to zero (the posted example uses Tri). Program a virtual controller with LFO1 as the source and the Rate of LFO1 as the destination, with a positive depth. This sets up a positive feedback loop that speeds up LFO1 when its signal is high and slows it down when its signal is low. This narrows the high excursion of the pulse waveform and widens its low excursion, reducing the pulse waveform’s duty cycle. (Yes, this is the same trick used in the simulated stepped glissando technique that I posted yesterday.) As the depth of the virtual controller increases both the pulse width and the frequency of LFO1 decrease. Adjust the frequency of LFO1 and the depth of the virtual controller to achieve as narrow a pulse as possible at the rate of "sampling" you desire. (You can temporarily modulate the pitch of an oscillator with LFO1 to audition the effect.) Program a second virtual controller with LFO1 as the source and the rate of LFO2 as the destination. As you increase the depth of this virtual controller the output of LFO2 will transform, changing from the sine, triangle or sawtooth wave that the LFO normally produces to a discretely stepped version of it. This happens because the output from LFO2 changes very slowly when LFO1 is low during most of its period and then changes very quickly during the very brief time that LFO1 is high. While this technique does not create a perfect sample-and-hold effect it is audibly quite close and distinctly different than the Random waveform, which also produces a stepped output.
  4. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This is an example of a little trick to simulate a sample-and-hold effect. It uses both of the solo-synth LFOs to turn a continuously changing waveform from one of the LFOs (LFO2) into a discretely stepped version. This works on both the XW-P1 and the XW-G1. How the technique works is described here. This example starts with a triangle (Tri) wave for LFO2. Change it to Sin, SawUp or SawDown to hear different effects. While here the stepped LFO modulates the pitch of a simple sawtooth wave it could be used to modulate anything.
  5. Simulated Sample-and-Hold View File This is an example of a little trick to simulate a sample-and-hold effect. It uses both of the solo-synth LFOs to turn a continuously changing waveform from one of the LFOs (LFO2) into a discretely stepped version. This works on both the XW-P1 and the XW-G1. How the technique works is described here. This example starts with a triangle wave for LFO2. Change it to a sine, an upwards ramp or a downwards ramp to hear different effects. While here the stepped LFO modulates the pitch of a simple sawtooth wave it could be used to modulate anything. Submitter AlenK Submitted 04/27/2017 Category XW-Synths  
  6. Well...Mine was going to go in my "studio" (uhm...a corner of my office!) but then the wife said "Let's keep it in the family room." One CS-67 stand later there it has stayed. The 560's MIDI connectors remain as virgin as the day it arrived. I really should hook something up to them just to be sure they work!
  7. Here’s a cool special effect that modifies a smooth pitch glide into a series of discrete steps. It depends on the ability of a solo-synth LFO to modulate one of its own parameters by way of a virtual controller. An example solo-synth tone file has been uploaded to the files area here if you would like to audition it or examine the patch for yourself. It should work equally well on both the XW-P1 and the XW-G1. Note that "glissando" has historically also meant a continuous pitch glide that in the synth world we almost always call "portamento." (LFO1 is used here but you can choose LFO2 instead if you prefer.) First, choose a narrow pulse for LFO1: Puls1:3. Set its Rate initially to, say, 50 (you will adjust it later). Program a virtual controller with LFO1 as the source and the Rate of LFO1 as the destination. Use a positive depth. This sets up a positive feedback loop that speeds up LFO1 when its signal is high and slows it down when its signal is low. This has the direct effect of both narrowing the high excursion of the pulse waveform and widening its low excursion, reducing the pulse waveform’s duty cycle. Program a second virtual controller with the output of LFO1 as the source and the portamento time of one or more of the pitched oscillators as the destination; choose S1-P2 to do all four internal pitched oscillators together. Enable portamento for the oscillators in question and set the portamento time (PortaTime) of each of them to a fairly high (and identical) value. Starting from zero decrease the depth value of the virtual controller (i.e., move it in the negative direction). The more negative the depth the shorter the portamento time becomes during a very small portion of the period of LFO1. The rest of the time it will be very long. This results in an essentially stepped response that is almost (but not quite) the same as the pitch changes that occur during a true, stepped glissando. With careful adjustment of the portamento time and the depth of the virtual controller modulating the portamento time, the desired glissando time between two notes can be achieved at the same time as the desired step size. For most musical purposes the step size should be a semitone or a whole tone (two semitones), but of course you can use whatever you like. Since both parameters affect step rate and step size at the same time some experimentation is in order. The tables below show the important solo synth settings, including those of the virtual controllers, for a specific simulated glissando that produces steps of approximately a whole tone at a rate of about 20 steps a second. Note that all four of the solo synth’s internal pitched oscillators are assumed to be involved. The example audio file is the same except only one oscillator (Syn1) is turned on. This technique doesn’t give the XW-P1 a true stepped glissando mode but it can nevertheless be useful (if difficult to configure!) as a special effect. Block Function Sub-function Parameter Value Syn1 – PCM2 Portamento On PortaTime 066 Oscillator LFO1 Depth 000 LFO1 Wavetype Puls1:3 Sync Off Rate 107 Clk.Sync --- Depth 067 Delay 000 Rise 000 Mod Depth 000 VC Source Destination Depth Purpose 1 LFO1 LFO1 Rate +126 Shortens the pulse length 2 LFO1 Portamento Time (P1 – S2) -128 LFO1 changes the portamento rate BTW, this is another "teaser" from an upcoming major revision of The XW-P1 Companion. Stay tuned!
  8. Simulated Discrete Glissando View File This is a cool special effect that modifies a smooth portamento pitch glide between two notes into a series of discrete steps. It should work equally well on both the XW-P1 and XW-G1. A full description of the technique can be found here. Submitter AlenK Submitted 04/26/2017 Category XW-Synths
  9. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This is an example of a cool special effect that modifies a smooth portamento pitch glide between two notes into a series of discrete steps. It should work equally well on both the XW-P1 and XW-G1. A full description of the technique can be found here. Note that this example uses just a single oscillator with a simple sawtooth waveform. The technique can be used with any of the pitched oscillators (Syn1, Syn2, PCM1, PCM2) configured with any waveforms and with any envelopes. You can also extend the technique to the external input oscillator using an additional virtual controller.
  10. Yes, it has always been there. But the description of it in the manual does not imply any kind of smoothing or interpolation, which is what I was trying to say was the good thing. All the manual describes is what amounts to a scaling function. Now, if _I_ had engineered that it would have used interpolation from the start. (And I could have done that; I spent over twenty years doing similar design work on embedded systems.) It's nice to see that the Casio engineers have improved it. Frankly, I hadn't noticed that it needed improvement because I never examined the operation of the knobs that closely. I've hardly used them at all. I'm still too busy making my XW-P1 do cartwheels and other tricks to devote much attention to the PX-560.
  11. Should I point out that if the release notes you see on the download page for V1.14 said more than "Improving expression pedal performance" and "Improving certain operation," or even if the manual addendum had been updated to explain the new functionality, there would be less user misunderstanding and frustration? Nah, surely the smart people at Casio know this already. They're just messing with us.
  12. We're crossing wires. I'm talking about the DATA ("value") that gets sent by the CC Bank Select command. The code ("control number") for the command itself is fixed by the MIDI spec, which I am already fairly well familiar with thank you (even if I do fail to read some documents that well sometimes). Since the command code itself is a known quantity and would not be different for ANY device transmitting MIDI data, the discussion of protocol should be about what data receiving devices expect along with the command. It never even occurred to me that you would be talking about the code for the command (which, yes has an LSB of 32 or 20h hexadecimal, the latter being how I'm used to thinking of it and the other reason It didn't occur to me that this is what you were talking about). The command CODE itself is NOT important in the context of our discussion here since I guarantee Ableton Live is sending the correct code (assuming it is sending it at all in the OP's situation, which it almost surely does).
  13. A System 100. Cool. Yeah, I saw that in a picture of you in your studio from gearslutz (you won...something ). The old Roland analog stuff sounded pretty good and was very well built. Back in the late 70's I rented a Roland SH-5 for a couple of weeks. I couldn't afford to buy a synth back then being a high school student with no real money. I have good memories of "noodling" on that thing. (I couldn't really play anything on a keyboard back then, only guitar). I was inspired by Larry Fast (Synergy) but I soon realized I wasn't going to be emulating him anytime soon without at least a multi-track tape deck...and maybe a Moog or two!
  14. The Grand Hybrid seems like a fine product and Casio should be justifiably proud of it. If I were looking for a full console piano for my home that would be on the short list.
  15. This sounds like some smoothing (interpolation) has been added to parameter changes made with the knobs when "Auto Resolution" is on. That does sound like a good thing, even better that it can be turned off when it is not desired.