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Casio CT-S is not a fullsize keyboard?


sunshine

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I like the Casio CT-S, but it's not a full size keyboard and I often make mistakes. I hope Casio will update to a full size keyboard (12key=165mm) .

 

1,This video gives full-size keyboard data at 5:45.

 

2,roland go is a true full size keyboard, check out this video

Edited by sunshine
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18 hours ago, sunshine said:

I like the Casio CT-S, but it's not a full size keyboard and I often make mistakes. I hope Casio will update to a full size keyboard (12key=165mm) .

 

 

When I measure an octave on my CT-S1, it is 162 to 163 mm depending on the octave. The statement that a full size octave = exactly 165 mm is incorrect. There is some acceptable variation from one manufacturer to the next. If you go to two different grand pianos, you will find some variation too. 2 or 3 mm per octave should not cause frequent mistakes. I think that the texture on the keys, the height and depth of the keys, and the key action are all much more likely to impact the number of mistakes compared to a very small difference in width. Lots of information on this topic available here: https://www.mrpianotoday.com/are-piano-keys-same-size/

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Posted (edited)
On 3/26/2024 at 8:55 AM, Jamietopol said:

When I measure an octave on my CT-S1, it is 162 to 163 mm depending on the octave. The statement that a full size octave = exactly 165 mm is incorrect. There is some acceptable variation from one manufacturer to the next. If you go to two different grand pianos, you will find some variation too. 2 or 3 mm per octave should not cause frequent mistakes. I think that the texture on the keys, the height and depth of the keys, and the key action are all much more likely to impact the number of mistakes compared to a very small difference in width. Lots of information on this topic available here: https://www.mrpianotoday.com/are-piano-keys-same-size/

"The standard dimensions of piano keys are generally consistent across most acoustic pianos. The white keys have an approximate length of 6.5 inches (16.5 cm)". 

I have checked Yamaha and Roland digital pianos and they are the same size as the acoustic piano (12key=165mm). Is the Casio digital piano the same as the CTS or the same as the acoustic piano?

Edited by sunshine
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Posted (edited)
On 3/26/2024 at 8:15 AM, Brad Saucier said:

Since the 80s, Casio portable keyboards with full size keys have been the same size as the CT-S1.  Nothing has changed in regards to that.  This doesn't include mini keyboard models of course.

I have checked Yamaha and Roland digital pianos and they are the same size as the acoustic piano (12key=165mm). Is the Casio digital piano the same as the CTS or the same as the acoustic piano?

Edited by sunshine
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Have you actually played a real acoustic piano? I have. I own one. I don't go between it and my CT-S1 (nor any of my other Casio keyboards) and notice any difference in the size of the keys. IMNSHO, you are wasting your time with this. Either the CT-S1 works for you or it does not. I have not heard a single other person complain about the key size of the CT-S series, and in fact, most people are blown away about the combination of portability and sound quality. I have a friend who busked across the U.S. with her CT-S1 and loves it. She also has an acoustic grand piano at home.

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Among my large collection of keyboards and synths, I have a modern Casiotone CT-S1000V and also a CT-S300. I also have a 1980 CT-201, the first ever Casio keyboard model. My other half, who is a professional classically trained pianist and accompanist,  has a 1974 K. Kawai Grand Piano at home and a Casio Privia portable electric piano (with hammer action  and weighted keys) for when a portable piano is needed. We have switched between all of these keyboards and never once has it been felt that the Casiotones weren't full sized keys. My partner has also played my Casios/ Casiotones on my recordings (when I needed a (much) better/ more skilled keyboard player), and never had an issue with their key size.

 

Sunshine, the quoted part in your post says:

 

"The standard dimensions of piano keys are generally consistent across most acoustic pianos. The white keys have an approximate length of 6.5 inches (16.5 cm)". 

 

Note the emphasis on "generally consistent", which indicates some minor variation is acceptable. In other words, the difference of 1 - 2mm in width over an octave is insignificant and would fall within accepted tolerances.

 

I can guarantee you that in a blind test, even an experienced pianist would not be able to notice such a small difference in key width. What they WOULD notice is the key texture and key action/ feel. Those are far more important considerations than a 1mm difference in octave width.

 

To be honest, you are attempting to highlight a problem that simply does not exist.

 

 

 

 

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 Hi there Sunshine. The CT-S1 is a quality instrument with a great keybed for the price and, with respect, I think you are seeing ghosts with regard key size. Casio have done a good job of cutting away the fat and concentrating on squeezing the important things into it.

 

 The soundset, on the whole, is fantastic for the money. A few questionable choices but the meat and potatoes of where it is aimed at are surprisingly good matched with a keyboard better than most simple MIDI controllers costing similar money. They've even thrown in a decent GM soundset with very little fanfare.

 

 Beyond the 'buttons' and main sounds available, the interface can appear a little arcane but I personally like the lack of clutter. It mamkes it 'feel' like a true instrument if that makes any sense? The most used functions, via the kehboard, soon become second nature after dipping into the manual a few times an printing off the reference pages from the manual.

 

 If you can check one out I'd highly recommend you do so. If it only had the piano and electric piano sounds in I would still have thought it was a bargain. I almost paid slightly less for a MIDI controller and the keyboard wasn't a patch on the one in the CT-S1.

 

 Regards, FIAW.

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Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, Joe Muscara said:

Have you actually played a real acoustic piano? I have. I own one. I don't go between it and my CT-S1 (nor any of my other Casio keyboards) and notice any difference in the size of the keys. IMNSHO, you are wasting your time with this. Either the CT-S1 works for you or it does not. I have not heard a single other person complain about the key size of the CT-S series, and in fact, most people are blown away about the combination of portability and sound quality. I have a friend who busked across the U.S. with her CT-S1 and loves it. She also has an acoustic grand piano at home.

Well, I'm a beginner, and everyone's adaptability is different. I like CTS very much, and I will work hard to improve my skills.

I checked Yamaha and Roland digital pianos, and they are almost the same size as the acoustic piano (12key≈165mm).

My question  is the casio digital piano similar in size to the acoustic piano or similar to the CTS?

(My English is not good, I am using translation software. If I offend everyone, please forgive me. Thank you everyone .)

Edited by sunshine
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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Chas said:

Among my large collection of keyboards and synths, I have a modern Casiotone CT-S1000V and also a CT-S300. I also have a 1980 CT-201, the first ever Casio keyboard model. My other half, who is a professional classically trained pianist and accompanist,  has a 1974 K. Kawai Grand Piano at home and a Casio Privia portable electric piano (with hammer action  and weighted keys) for when a portable piano is needed. We have switched between all of these keyboards and never once has it been felt that the Casiotones weren't full sized keys. My partner has also played my Casios/ Casiotones on my recordings (when I needed a (much) better/ more skilled keyboard player), and never had an issue with their key size.

 

Sunshine, the quoted part in your post says:

 

"The standard dimensions of piano keys are generally consistent across most acoustic pianos. The white keys have an approximate length of 6.5 inches (16.5 cm)". 

 

Note the emphasis on "generally consistent", which indicates some minor variation is acceptable. In other words, the difference of 1 - 2mm in width over an octave is insignificant and would fall within accepted tolerances.

 

I can guarantee you that in a blind test, even an experienced pianist would not be able to notice such a small difference in key width. What they WOULD notice is the key texture and key action/ feel. Those are far more important considerations than a 1mm difference in octave width.

 

To be honest, you are attempting to highlight a problem that simply does not exist.

 

 

 

 

Well, I'm a beginner, and everyone's adaptability is different. I like CTS very much, and I will work hard to improve my skills.

I checked Yamaha and Roland digital pianos, and they are almost the same size as the acoustic piano (12key≈165mm).

My question  is the casio digital piano similar in size to the acoustic piano or similar to the CTS?

(My English is not good, I am using translation software. If I offend everyone, please forgive me. Thank you everyone.)

Edited by sunshine
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If it helps, here's a picture of my CT-S1000V alongside a 1974 K. Kawai acoustic Grand Piano (8 or 9 feet long, I forget the size).

 

20240401_175937.thumb.jpg.4a7f33230f42c90aec588099514ad1d7.jpg

 

 

 

With the left hand end of the pictured CT-S keyboard aligned with the Kawai, at the right hand end, this is the difference:

 

 

 

20240401_174718.thumb.jpg.34f2b9c4c5a0cee6bc2420acd093c352.jpg

 

 

Over five octaves, the overall difference of the keyboard width between a Kawai acoustic Grand Piano and a Casiotone CT-S keyboard is about 5mm/ 0.5 centimeter. That works out as a difference of  1mm per octave.

 

That really is such a tiny difference that without seeing the CT-S keyboard next to an acoustic piano keyboard, I really don't think most pianists would notice.

At the end of the day, best thing is to go and try a CT-S and see if it feels comfortable to you. Also bear in mind that the CT-S doesn't have hammer action or weighted keys that an acoustic piano would have. Looking at the Roland Go piano specifications, those don't have those features either. Like the CT-S1 and some other CT-S models, the Roland has velocity sensitive keys that would put it more into "synth action" rather than genuine piano hammer action weighted keys. If you want hammer action and weighted keys, you'll need to look at dedicated electric pianos that cost a lot more than a CT-S1. Casio have a whole line of highly rated pianos , such as their Privia, CDP and Celviano range for that purpose.

 

Edited by Chas
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On 4/3/2024 at 1:12 PM, Chas said:

If it helps, here's a picture of my CT-S1000V alongside a 1974 K. Kawai acoustic Grand Piano (8 or 9 feet long, I forget the size).

 

20240401_175937.thumb.jpg.4a7f33230f42c90aec588099514ad1d7.jpg

 

 

 

With the left hand end of the pictured CT-S keyboard aligned with the Kawai, at the right hand end, this is the difference:

 

 

 

20240401_174718.thumb.jpg.34f2b9c4c5a0cee6bc2420acd093c352.jpg

 

 

Over five octaves, the overall difference of the keyboard width between a Kawai acoustic Grand Piano and a Casiotone CT-S keyboard is about 5mm/ 0.5 centimeter. That works out as a difference of  1mm per octave.

 

That really is such a tiny difference that without seeing the CT-S keyboard next to an acoustic piano keyboard, I really don't think most pianists would notice.

At the end of the day, best thing is to go and try a CT-S and see if it feels comfortable to you. Also bear in mind that the CT-S doesn't have hammer action or weighted keys that an acoustic piano would have. Looking at the Roland Go piano specifications, those don't have those features either. Like the CT-S1 and some other CT-S models, the Roland has velocity sensitive keys that would put it more into "synth action" rather than genuine piano hammer action weighted keys. If you want hammer action and weighted keys, you'll need to look at dedicated electric pianos that cost a lot more than a CT-S1. Casio have a whole line of highly rated pianos , such as their Privia, CDP and Celviano range for that purpose.

 

I bought cts before, but returned it because the white and black keys of cts1 are smaller than my yamaha p125, thank you for your answer

 

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