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PX330 Power Jack Broken?


BradHoehne

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Hi, 

I have a PX 330 and am having trouble plugging in the power supply. The power adaptor has nothing to contain it.   The 12V plug (the hole in the back of the keyboard) has two small prongs inside, whereas the power adapter itself (the end of the wire that you put into the power supply) has a single tiny hole in a round plug.

I searched around for a replacement part for my keyboard and found this:

https://www.fullcompass.com/prod/520236-casio-10334294-dc-jack-for-px-330-ap-220-wk-7600

My question is this:

How difficult is it to replace this part? 

I have a very modest amount of experience with soldering (usually computer parts) with a simple soldering gun, but am not an electronics expert by any means.   Should I have my keyboard repaired, or is this something that someone without a lot of experience can attempt themselves?

Thanks,

Brad  

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Hi Brad,

 

It's not difficult to solder something like this. But first things first... what happened to the old power socket? Have you opened the keyboard up to look at the circuit board? Can we have a photo? Also, what kind of soldering iron have you got? "Gun" normally implies something quite big and powerful and you want something quite dainty for this sort of work :)

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13 hours ago, IanB said:

Hi Brad,

 

It's not difficult to solder something like this. But first things first... what happened to the old power socket? Have you opened the keyboard up to look at the circuit board? Can we have a photo? Also, what kind of soldering iron have you got? "Gun" normally implies something quite big and powerful and you want something quite dainty for this sort of work :)

Not sure what happened to the old power socket, except to note that it's always had a bit of "play"

Here's a picture of the plug and socket:

Thanks!

Brad H.

Casio12VPlug.jpg

Casio12VPlug-2.jpg

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Oh that's a bit weird looking. Normally those sockets have a single centre pin but maybe the two prongs are meant to fit in the centre hole. The flat bit on the left is the external barrel contact. I would guess the shell of the connector has broken internally. You're going to need to get this baby open and see what's going on inside. Then give us another photograph :)

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5 minutes ago, IanB said:

Oh that's a bit weird looking. Normally those sockets have a single centre pin but maybe the two prongs are meant to fit in the centre hole. The flat bit on the left is the external barrel contact. I would guess the shell of the connector has broken internally. You're going to need to get this baby open and see what's going on inside. Then give us another photograph :)

Thanks. 

What's the easiest way to access this part?   I don't want to disassemble the keyboard any more than I have to.

Brad H.

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I don't know this model specifically and can't find a service manual (it really is time Casio and other manufacturers made them all available for free on the internets, come on!) but it generally involves taking all the screws out of the bottom and taking it apart. That should get you access to the PCBs. Avoid any screws once inside that are holding the keyboard assembly together.

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Hi, 

I got the part (quickly and easily from FullCompass, highly endorsed) to replace the power jack.   This is what I find when I disassemble the keyboard.  All looks good on the inside, but the inner plastic tube that holds the wire connections in place appears to have broken loose (see the picture above), so the part does need replacement. 

Do you have any thoughts on the easiest way to replace the part?   I've done light soldering (with the soldering tool shown) before, but am not familiar with this configuration.

Thanks!

Brad H.



 

CasioRepair.jpg

CasioRepair-2.jpg

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Brad, this should be fairly easy. Obviously you need to get access to the other side of the PCB. You will also need to break the glue I see there on the side of the socket which is there for extra stability. You shouldn't need to worry about replacing that. Your soldering iron should be fine, and you'll need some leaded 60/40 solder (don't use lead-free, it's rubbish).

Personally I would approach this by breaking the old socket gently into bits, until you've just got the pins sticking out of the board and they can be removed one at a time. It's already broken so you don't want to worry about preserving it. Then you can heat each solder pad on its own, and tease the pin out with a pair of thin nosed pliers. Sometimes you can just push the old pin through until it falls out. If the old solder is reluctant to melt, add some new solder (it's counter-intuitive but it works).

 

Then make sure the holes are clear, put the new part in place and resolder. Make sure your iron is touching the pad and the pin when you're heating them up.

Can't think of anything else to add, this is pretty straightforward. If you have any more questions please ask.

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Success!

The procedure was fairly easy.  (But, jeesh, there are a lot of screws to unscrew and an awful lot of PCB plugs to unplug).

The only issues I had were:

1) I lost first few screws in the body of the keyboard when removing them from the "windows" in the back.  Since I don't have a magnetic screwdriver, I ended up laying on my back on the floor and unscrewing the rest of them in such a way that if they were to fall, the would fall out of the hole.   This worked, but I can now hear the screws I lost inside the body of the keyboard when I move it around.
2) I had trouble getting the solder to lay flat on the PCB.  It had a tendency to bead up and required a lot of "smearing" to get it to touch the contacts.

But, other than that, no issues.  

Thanks for your help!

Brad H.


CasioRepair-3.thumb.jpg.0ea6b909e6e90aa30251a56e37a5da92.jpg

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Glad it worked Brad! You'll want to get those screws out though, they will drive you mad rolling around and may cause problems if they get into the wrong bit of the works. Also, soldering is an acquired skill and if the solder is "beading up" the surface isn't hot enough. But glad you got there in the end. :)

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On 5/25/2020 at 7:44 PM, IanB said:

I don't know this model specifically and can't find a service manual (it really is time Casio and other manufacturers made them all available for free on the internets, come on!) but it generally involves taking all the screws out of the bottom and taking it apart. That should get you access to the PCBs. Avoid any screws once inside that are holding the keyboard assembly together.

I agree, when buying a keyboard besides a good user manual also the service manual must be available for the users as well.

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Another tip I use for screws that are buried-many of the Casios have these recessed screws inside the little "hatches" underneath-I've done it this way because even with a magnetic screwdriver-the hammers are steel and magnetic-and get pulled into the screwdriver and can get in the way of removing the screws-I use "poster putty"-for sticking up papers-a tiny bit on the screwdriver tip will grab the screw head enough to keep it on the screwdriver. I've had to come up with this as many recessed screws are easy to lose. I also have a telescoping magnetic tool which reaches hard to get at places-might help you fetch out those screws inside and Ian is right-you don't want those floating around-could get stuck in the key mechanism, or even short out a connection on an IC board-chances are slim this would happen, but better to be safe than sorry. and i agree with Ian, sounds like beading solder-make sure you get a good hot solder joint-it should flow onto your surfaces. if it doesn't-might also mean your parts are oxidized-I use solder flux (non-acid based) for stubborn or larger solder connections.  I was also trained to heat the connection, not the solder, and lead the solder onto the connection or part. I am not always able to do that-but I always try to do both. Otherwise, your solder might seem to stick, but it is not conducting and will fail, could be seemingly tight-but it is being held on by solder flux instead of metal to metal. 

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Quote

could get stuck in the key mechanism, or even short out a connection on an IC board-chances are slim this would happen

 

My own general experience is that a loose screw or other loose conductive fragment will always find its way into the most damaging place it can, and will normally prefer to get solidly wedged in there!

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Well-I was trying to be-not discourage Brad-you are right. That's why I have all these magnetic retrieving tools!!! Nothing like finding that 1-2 keys that seem to be cemented in place because one screw took up permanent residence there.....not that that's ever happened to me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

!:hitt: 

And Brad-might be a good idea-a pencil soldering tool is good-but I use variable temperature controlled stations with replaceable tips-you will thank yourself for having one-if only because 1) now you will have a safe place to rest that soldering pencil before you melt it into a family keepsake

2) you are less likely to pick it up by the tip (not that I've done that-well once..) and

3) you can dial down the temperature to prevent overheating and damaging any delicate components nearby. Plus, tips don't last forever, the heat alone with repeated use deteriorates these over time. Like me, deteriorating--never mind. am I wrong Ian? 

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  • 1 year later...

Think I may have a similar problem, in that now when I plug in the adapter and switch on my PX-330, the power doesn't always come on: have to move the connector about in the socket until it finally makes contact and switches on: seems to take more jiggling it about each time too. The connector doesn't appear to be damaged, so I'm guessing it's something wrong in the socket part? Don't think my technical skills are up to repairing it myself! Any piano techs in the Edinburgh (Scotland) area or nearby?
(I also need a "pingy" note fixed at the same time! Have been told that could be due to dirty contacts)

Edited by Trish S
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